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Blackwell Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'blackwell'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 850 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This first part contains the charters from folios 1 to 233, items I to DXCIII. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated.

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Guisborough Cartulary
 (1119-1300)
Churchwardens and other parishioners in Buckinghamshire (1552)
In accordance with a royal commission of 16 May 1552, inventories were taken of the valuables held by individual parishes throughout England. These records survived in the Public Record Office, and were transcribed by the Reverend J. E. Brown, vicar of Studham, edited for the Alcuin Club by F. C. Eeles, and published in 1908. Some additional material from Additional MS 34,741 and Lansdowne MS 1045, in the British Museum, was incorporated. The people whose names appear in these records are mostly the churchwardens and those respectable parishioners to whose custody some of the valuables had been entrusted.

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Churchwardens and other parishioners in Buckinghamshire
 (1552)
London funerals and other news (1550-1563)
Henry Machyn was a citizen and merchant-taylor of London. He had a professional interest in the lavish funerals of his fellow citizens, and in October 1550 started a note book giving brief details of these occasions. Soon he added political news, and (in an age before newspapers) he had a journalist's eye for accidents, hangings, the preachings and suppression of heretics, and the fortunes and misfortunes of dissidents. He lived in interesting times; the early death of Edward VI; the failed attempt to install Jane on the throne; the succession of queen Mary, and a lurch towards Catholicism; her marriage to Philip of Spain; her death, and the accession of queen Elizabeth. Machyn's humble journal, written for his own amusement and with a resolute indifference to orthography, became in its time an important historical source, used by Strype, and then edited by John Gough Nichols for the Camden Society and published in 1848.

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London funerals and other news
 (1550-1563)
Militia in Carhampton hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Carhampton, Culbone (Kilner), Cutcombe, (the market town of) Dunster, Exford, Luckham (Luccombe), Luxborough, (the seaport and market town of) Minehead, Oare, Porlock, Selworthy, Stoke Pero, Timberscombe, Treborough, Withycombe and Wootton Courtney. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Carhampton hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Militia in Chew hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Chew Magna, Chew Stoke, Clutton, Dundry, Norton Malreward, Stowey and Timsbury, north of Radstock. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Chew hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Official Papers (1547-1580)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1547-1580)
St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1584)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was a maiden or a widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides
 (1584)
Lawyers and officers of Lincoln's Inn (1422-1586)
Lincoln's Inn is one of the ancient inns of court in London exclusively invested with the right to call lawyers to the English bar. The Black Books of Lincoln's Inn are the main administrative records of the society, containing the names of those filling the different offices year by year; the annual accounts of the Pensioner and the Treasurer; regulations; punishments and fines for misdemeanours. This edition, printed for the Inn in 1897, covers the first five surviving volumes.

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Lawyers and officers of Lincoln's Inn
 (1422-1586)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1591)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1591)
St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1595)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

BLACKWELL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides
 (1595)
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