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Biby Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'biby'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 15 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1342-1362)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Clement VI and Innocent VI, from the period when the papal court was resident at Avignon. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Clement VI was consecrated and crowned 19 May 1342 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); Innocent VI was crowned 18 December 1352 and died 12 September 1362. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss and C. Johnson from Regesta cxxxvii to ccxliv, and published in 1897. The registers are almost complete for these two pontificates. At his accession, Clement VI promised to grant benefices to all poor clerks who should come to Avignon and claim them within two months of his coronation. As many as 100,000 are said to have come, and the register for the first year of his pontificate runs to twelve volumes.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1342-1362)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1458-1471)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of popes Pius II and Paul II. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1458-1471)
Poor English Pilgrims in Rome (1505)
Registers of English pilgrims staying in Rome, preserved among the archives of the English College, were extracted by W. C. Trevelyan and communicated to the Rev. John Hodgson, who published them in 1838. Two separate lists were maintained - of the rich and nobles, and of the poor. Both lists give date, full name, and diocese of origin in England and Wales.

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Poor English Pilgrims in Rome
 (1505)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1669-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1669-1679)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
Treasury Books (1699-1700)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain and the colonies, from August 1699 to September 1700. These include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors. The calendar was prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury and published in 1933, from Treasury Minute Books xi and xii (T29/11-12); King's Warrant Book xx (T52/20); Money Books xiv and xv (T53/14-15); Order Book v (T60/5); Disposition Book xv (T61/15); Out Letters (General) xvi (T27/16); Out Letters (Customs) xiv (T11/14); Reference Book vii (Index 4621); Warrants not Relating to Money xvi (T54/16); Out Letters (Ireland) vii and viii (T14/7-8); Caveat Book i (T64/40); and Out Letters (Plantations Auditor) ii (T64/89).

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Treasury Books
 (1699-1700)
Treasury and Customs Officials, Officers and Pensioners (1713)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies

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Treasury and Customs Officials, Officers and Pensioners
 (1713)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1742)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1742

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1742)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Norfolk (1775)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/59

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Apprentices registered in Norfolk
 (1775)
Inhabitants of Neath in Glamorgan (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Nottingham). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Neath in Glamorgan
 (1790-1797)
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