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Beyford Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'beyford'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 4 records (displaying 1 to 4): 

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Pipe Roll (1241-1242)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 26th year of the reign of king Henry III, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1241 to Michaelmas 1242. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons arising from the proceedings of the justices. The text was edited by Henry Lewin Cannon for Yale Historical Publications and printed in 1918. The name of the county is given at the head of each page, and variant spellings, omissions and additions found in the duplicate Chancellor's Roll [C. R.] are given in the footnotes.

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Pipe Roll
Freemen and citizens of London (1314-1337)
Letter Book D, or the Liber Rubeus (Red Book) of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. In addition, this volume includes the record of admissions to the freedom of the city by redemption (payment of a sum of money), and the binding and discharge of apprenticeships for the same period. Without freedom of the city - which could only be gained by birth (patrimony), apprenticeship or servitude, or by redemption - no man could open a shop, sell goods retail, or even reside within the city walls (except for a limited time, and then only in the houses of freemen and under frankpledge). The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1902.

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Freemen and citizens of London
Payments by the English crown (1370)
The Exitus or Issue Roll of the Exchequer, compiled by the Clerk of the Pell, recorded all issues or payments made by the English crown: presents of plate and jewellery to foreign nobility; household payments to officers and servants; wardrobe payments; alms; payments for the upkeep of royal palaces, manors, residences and chapels; repayments of loans to the king; payments to messengers and couriers; wages of mercenaries; the upkeep of the navy; ransoming of hostages; maintenance of castles, forts, garrisons and fortifications; salaries of judges and other officers of the courts of Chancery, Exchequer, King's Bench and Common Pleas; as well as a host of miscellaneous other items. This is a translation of the text of the roll for the 44th year of the reign of king Edward III, when Thomas de Brantingham, Bishop of Exeter, was Lord High Treasurer of England.

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Payments by the English crown
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/4

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British merchant seamen
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