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Berth Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'berth'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Inhabitants of Norwich (1288-1391)
Among the documents preserved in the record room of the Guildhall in the city of Norwich were 13 rolls connected with the leet courts in the city during the 13th and 14th centuries while the frankpledge system on which they were based was still in full operation. William Hudson, vicar of St Peter Permountergate in the city, prepared a copy of the earliest of these, from 1288, and extracts from the leet rolls of 1289, 1290, 1291, 1293, 1296, 1300, c1307, 1313, 1375 and 1391, and from an account of amercements in 1364, a tithing roll of Mancroft leet of 1311, and inquisitions before the bailiffs in 1350, and these were published by the Selden Society in 1892, with an English translation facing the extended Latin text. In 1288 there were four leets in the city - Conesford (North Conesford, South Conesford and Berstrete subleets), Manecroft (St Stephen, St Peter de Manecroft), Wymer or Westwyk (St Giles, St Gregory, St Andrew and St George), and Over the Water (St Michael and St Clement. Each leet had separate courts and separate records within the rolls. Hudson lists the main categories of items recorded as: murder, violent death, nuisances, weights, unwholesome food, larceny, assaults, hue and cry, being out of tithing, non-attendance at leet, purprestures, forestalling, unlawful trading, craft gilds, fraudulent work, and impleading in the Court Christian.

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Inhabitants of Norwich
 (1288-1391)
Treasury and Customs Records (1718)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies

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Treasury and Customs Records
 (1718)
Owners of Merchantmen (1804)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), or copper fastened (c f) or copper bolted (c b), sometimes with a date, such as (17)88. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1804, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repairs; len. lengthened; lrp. large repairs; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; S. rprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough Repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel. Where the vessel was armed, the number of guns is given, and occasionally a remark such as 'captured' will appear. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was United States property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; some were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second; I., third - O and U for fourth and fifth are never used) and its stores (1, first; 2, second; 3, third) and the year of survey, e. g. 00 for 1800, or, if surveyed during 1803, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to owners in the main list and the supplement.

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Owners of Merchantmen
 (1804)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the great bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1830-1842)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Assistance (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Canton clasp, for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Assistance
 (1856-1860)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Banterer (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Canton clasp, for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; and the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Banterer
 (1856-1860)
Irish Debtors and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), and bankruptcies in Ireland, October to December 1881

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Irish Debtors and Bankrupts
 (1881)
Irish Debtors and Bankrupts (1882)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), and bankruptcies in Ireland, January to March 1882

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Irish Debtors and Bankrupts
 (1882)
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