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Bellingam Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bellingam'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 5 records (displaying 1 to 5): 

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Carew Manuscripts (1575-1588)
One of the few detailed sources surviving for 16th-century Ireland is this compilation of government papers and correspondence made by sir George Carew.

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Carew Manuscripts
Sussex Knighthood Special Commission: East Grinstead hundred (1630)
King Charles I 28 January 1630 issued a commission to sit in London and treat with all his subjects who would compound for their fines for not taking up knighthood (a responsibility incumbent on all men of full age having 40 or more a year in land) and for non-attendance to receive their knighthood at his coronation. The returns from the commissioners for Sussex, preserved in the Public Record Office, were edited by sir Henry Ellis and published in 1864. The returns are arranged by rape, the collectors giving the full name of each person paying their composition (usually 10): but more detail is supplied under the returns from the special commission that then certified those persons who had not appeared, refused to pay or excused themselves as being under age or of insufficient means &c. 'notwithstanding they are fitt and able men'. The returns from the special commission specify either the hundred (within the rape) or the parish of residence.

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Sussex Knighthood Special Commission: East Grinstead hundred
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1731)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 2 November 1731.

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Masters and Apprentices
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Hannibal in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Hannibal, a 90-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site. This index also covers Mortar Boat No. 13, the Hannibal's tender.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Hannibal in the Crimean War
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