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Bella Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bella'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Curia Regis Rolls (1196-1201)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1196-1201)
Curia Regis Rolls (1210-1212)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1210-1212)
Curia Regis Rolls (1219-1220)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period. Rolls 71 and 71B for Michaelmas term of the 3rd and 4th years, and 72 and 73 for Hilary term and Easter term of the 4th year of the reign of king Henry III (Michaelmas 1219 to Easter 1220) were edited by C. T. Flower of the Public Record Office and published in 1938. Each entry is copied in full, the Latin extended from the abbreviated original, the personal and place names given as in the original; where these vary between duplicate rolls, variant spellings are given in the footnotes. The county of each case was marked in the margin in the originals, and this is shown in italics at the start of each entry in the printed edition.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1219-1220)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire (1297)
Taxation roll of the lay (non-clergy) inhabitants of Yorkshire from the 25th year of the reign of king Edward I. Latin

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire
 (1297)
Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset (1001-1500)
Three early registers of the dean and chapter of Wells - the Liber Albus I (White Book; R I), Liber Albus II (R III), and Liber Ruber (Red Book; R II, section i) - were edited by W. H. B. Bird for the Historical Manuscripts Commissioners and published in 1907. These three books comprise, with some repetition, a cartulary of possessions of the cathedral, with grants of land dating back as early as the 8th century, well before the development of hereditary surnames in England; acts of the dean and chapter; and surveys of their estates, mostly in Somerset.

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Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset
 (1001-1500)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Masters of Merchantmen (1785)
The Daily Universal Register of January 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Poole and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Downs, in the Humber, in Bantry Bay, off Beachy Head, off Beer Haven, off Cape Clear, off Cape Fear, off Hastings, off Hilston, off Portland, off Porto Bar, off Scilly, at Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Belfast, Bilbao, Bonny, Bordeaux, Boulogne, Bremen, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Cape Breton, Cartagena, Charlestown, Chester, Constantinople, Cork, Corunna, Cowes, Creek, Crookhaven, Dantzig, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Exeter, Falmouth, Faro, Figuera, Genoa, Gibraltar, Gottenburg, Greenock, Grenada, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Havannah, Hoylake, Hull, Jersey, Killybegs, Lancaster, Leghorn, Leith, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, L'Orient, Lowestoft, Madeira, Madras, Milford, Minorca, Mogador, Naples, New Calabar, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Nice, Old Calabar, Oporto, Ostend, Peel, Penzance, Philadelphia, Piscatequa, Plymouth, Pondicherry, Port Roseway, Porto, Portsmouth, Rochelle, Ross, Rotterdam, St Kitts, St Lucia, St Michael, St Vincents, Savannah, Scarborough, Southampton, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Torbay, Vigo, Waterford, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Angola, Grenadoes, Honduras, the Isle of Wight, Jamaica, Maryland, New England, Newfoundland, Philadelphia and Virginia; and Reports of Ships made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1785)
Traders and Merchants in London (1797)
The Universal British Directory was published in five volumes, starting in 1791. The professions included in the London section are very diverse: the addresses are mostly from central London. The publication of the provincial volumes took several years, so this London supplement was added, compiled about 1797.

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Traders and Merchants in London
 (1797)
Masters of Merchantmen (1804)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), or copper fastened (c f) or copper bolted (c b), sometimes with a date, such as (17)88. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1804, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repairs; len. lengthened; lrp. large repairs; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; S. rprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough Repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel. Where the vessel was armed, the number of guns is given, and occasionally a remark such as 'captured' will appear. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was United States property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; some were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second; I., third - O and U for fourth and fifth are never used) and its stores (1, first; 2, second; 3, third) and the year of survey, e. g. 00 for 1800, or, if surveyed during 1803, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to masters in the main list.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1804)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
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