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Belam Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'belam'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 15 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire (1266-1279)
The register of archbishop Walter Giffard of York, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, was edited by William Brown for the Surtees Society and published in 1904. The ancient diocese of York covered all of Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, as well as Lancashire north of the Ribble, southern Westmorland, and Hexhamshire in Northumberland. But there are few entries relating to the archdeaconry of Richmond, and few about the peculiar jurisdictions of Southwell, Ripon, Beverley and Hexham. The dioceses of Carlisle and Durham, both in the province of York, are hardly mentioned. Archbishop Giffard spent much of his pontificate away from his diocese, and the register has gaps: but at least it survives, unlike those for his immediate predecessors, Sewall de Boville (1256-1258) and Godfrey de Ludham (1258-1264). Moreover, there are ordination lists (pages 187 to 198) of acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests ordained in 1267 to 1274. These usually give full name, and indicate whether the man was 'religious' (a monk or friar), and whether his 'title' (sponsorship) arose from his own patrimony, but 'title' is not usually otherwise specified.

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire
 (1266-1279)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Strafforth wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Rotherham and Sheffield.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Strafforth wapentake
 (1379)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in York (1764)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Durham return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/55

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Masters of apprentices registered in York
 (1764)
Inhabitants of Portsmouth, in Hampshire (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory of 1805 to 1807 included a provincial section, listing professional people and traders in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. (The sample scan here is from the listing for Bath)

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Inhabitants of Portsmouth, in Hampshire
 (1805)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Portsea Island (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Portsea Island
 (1861)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the Military Labour Corps (1860-1870)
Each year outstanding soldiers were chosen for good conduct medals and gratuities: these are listed here. There were two lists, one for men recommended for the Good Conduct Medal without a gratuity, and one for gratuities - 5 to a private, 10 to a corporal, and 15 to a serjeant. Both lists are indexed here, and each gives rank, name, regimental number, date of recommendation and date of issue. (The sample scan is from the 105th foot)

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Outstanding soldiers of the Military Labour Corps
 (1860-1870)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1880)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, April to June 1880

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1880)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, July to September 1881

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1881)
Retired officers of the Royal Navy and the Royal Marines (1898)
The Navy List, published by Authority, corrected to 18 December 1898, has this list of the officers on the Retired List of the Royal Navy and the Royal Marines. Each officer's surname, christian name, and any middle initial(s) is given; with rank, and date of seniority in that rank. The ranks are: A, Admiral; A E, Assistant Engineer; A F, Admiral of the Fleet; A P, Assistant Paymaster; Art E, Artificer Engineer; As Ck, Assistant Clerk; B, Boatswain; Bandr, Bandmaster Royal Marines; C, Captain; Car, Carpenter; Ch, Chaplain; Ch B, Chief Boatswain; Ch Cr, Chief Carpenter; Ch E, Chief Engineer; Ch Gr, Chief Gunner; Ch P; Paymaster-in-Chief; Ck, Clerk; Cr, Commander; D I H, Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals and Fleets; E, Engineer; E Ins, Inspector of Machinery; F E, Fleet Engineer; F P, Fleet Paymaster; F S, Fleet Surgeon; Gr, Gunner; H Sch, Head Schoolmaster; I H, Inspector-General of Hospitals and Fleets; L, Lieutenant; Mid, Midshipman; N C, Naval Cadet; N I, Naval Instructor; P, Paymaster; R A, Rear Admiral; S, Surgeon; S C, Staff-Captain; S Cr, Staff Commander; S E, Staff Engineer; S L, Sub-Lieutenant; S P, Staff Paymaster; S S, Staff Surgeon; Schm, Schoolmaster Royal Marines; St Ma, Sergeant Major Royal Marines; V A, Vice Admiral; W O, Warrant Officer Royal Marines.

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Retired officers of the Royal Navy and the Royal Marines
 (1898)
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