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Becon Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'becon'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Indults for Portable Altars: Diocese of Lincoln (1404-1415)
Individuals (laymen, monks or priests) could obtain indults or indulgences from the Pope to possess portable altars, enabling them to do their devotions in unconsecrated places. The fee was 10 groats for one person, 12 for two (frequently a husband and wife). Lists of these indults, headed De Altaris Portatilibus, were entered in the Lateran Regesta in the Vatican archives; from the reigns of popes Innocent VII to John XXIII (1404 to 1415) there are such lists in volumes CXIX, CXXXI, CLIX to CLXI, CLXV, CLXVII and CLXXXIV, from the first year of Innocent VII, the second year of Gregory XII, and the second to fifth years of John XXIII. Those relating to the British Isles were copied and translated by J. A. Twemlow, and printed under the direction of the Master of the Rolls in 1904. The diocese of Lincoln included Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Rutland, Northamptonshire, Oxfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire and part of Hertfordshire.

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Indults for Portable Altars: Diocese of Lincoln
 (1404-1415)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
London funerals and other news (1550-1563)
Henry Machyn was a citizen and merchant-taylor of London. He had a professional interest in the lavish funerals of his fellow citizens, and in October 1550 started a note book giving brief details of these occasions. Soon he added political news, and (in an age before newspapers) he had a journalist's eye for accidents, hangings, the preachings and suppression of heretics, and the fortunes and misfortunes of dissidents. He lived in interesting times; the early death of Edward VI; the failed attempt to install Jane on the throne; the succession of queen Mary, and a lurch towards Catholicism; her marriage to Philip of Spain; her death, and the accession of queen Elizabeth. Machyn's humble journal, written for his own amusement and with a resolute indifference to orthography, became in its time an important historical source, used by Strype, and then edited by John Gough Nichols for the Camden Society and published in 1848.

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London funerals and other news
 (1550-1563)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1568)
By Act of Parliament of December 1566 a subsidy of 8d in the on moveable goods and 4s in the on the annual value of land was raised from the lay (as opposed to clergy) population. These are the returns for Suffolk, printed in 1909 in the Suffolk Green Book series.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1568)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1558-1570)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1558-1570)
Official Papers (1547-1580)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1547-1580)
Middlesex Sessions (1549-1603)
This printed calendar collates a number of surviving records from Middlesex sessions for the period. Principally these are the Gaol Delivery Rolls (G. D. R.) and the General Sessions of the Peace Rolls (G. S. O. P. R.). Both series cover general criminal indictments (bills) together with the recognizances of the witnesses to attend; but the Gaol Delivery Rolls, by their very nature, tend to deal with the more serious cases - felonies where the accused could not be released on bail. The General Sessions rolls also include the sheriff's lists of bailiffs, sub-bailiffs, high and petty constables in the shire; writs of venire facias for production of jurors, writs of capias, lists of jurors, jury-panels &c. The Gaol Delivery Rolls also include coroners' inquests, writs of supersedeas, and memoranda of proclamations. Special inquiries are recorded in separate Sessions of Oyer and Terminer (S. O. T.) rolls and Inquest or Inquisition rolls (I. R.) Although coverage is good, none of the sequences of rolls for this period is complete. A peculiarity of this calendar is that in the case of actual incidents, the date given at the start of each entry is the date that the incident was alleged to have taken place (for instance, 1 June 11 Elizabeth (1569) in the sample scan) rather than the date of the court proceedings.

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Middlesex Sessions
 (1549-1603)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage. This index also includes marriage licence allegations for the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, 1558 to 1699.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1679)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1720)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 5 September to 31 December 1720.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1720)
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