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Beckly Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'beckly'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Post Office Accounts (1715-1716)
Abstract of the Treasury declared accounts for the Post Office, Lady Day 1715 to Lady Day 1716. AO 1/1960/48. Includes the names of many local postmasters.

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Post Office Accounts
 (1715-1716)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1719)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 22 June to 31 December 1719.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1719)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
National ArchivesMasters of clerks and apprentices (1784)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1784. IR 1/32

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Masters of clerks and apprentices
 (1784)
Traders and professionals in London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet of Businesses, Professions, &c.': coverage is good; about 30,000 individuals are recorded.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1805)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Missionaries and contributors (1863)
The Evangelical Magazine and Missionary Chronicle records the work of Christian missionaries throughout the world, and of the supporting missionary societies collecting money for the work in the British Isles. Contributions are listed by congregation, and by family members making donations.

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Missionaries and contributors
 (1863)
Debtors (1887)
County Court Judgments in England and Wales. July to September 1887

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Debtors
 (1887)
Residents of Portslade and Southern Cross (1940)
Kelly's Directory of Brighton, Hove, Portslade and Neighbourhood for 1940 includes this list of Private Residents of Portslade and Southern Cross (S. C.).

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Residents of Portslade and Southern Cross
 (1940)
Boys entering Sherborne School (1941)
The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.

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Boys entering Sherborne School
 (1941)
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