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Beadnall Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'beadnall'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors (1648-1660)
King Charles I was executed 30 January 1649, the kingship was abolished and government by a Council of State was established 14 February 1649. Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector 16 December 1653; died 3 September 1658; and was succeeded by his son Richard, who abdicated 24 May 1659. Charles II was established on the throne 29 May 1660. From 1648 to 1660 parliament sequestrated royalists' estates, restoring many by a process of heavy fines called compounding; this was administered by the Committee for Compounding, working through county committees. These raised considerable amounts of money, money which was vitally necessary for maintaining the parliamentary army's campaigns to subdue opposition in the three kingdoms - England, Scotland and Ireland. The raising and delivery of these monies was the responsibility of the Committee for Advance of Money (C. A. M.). The records of these committees were detailed and extensive, amounting to about 300 volumes, and were calendared for the Public Record Office by Mary Anne Everett Green. Abstracts of the county Durham and Northumberland entries were collated by Richard Welford with a manuscript transcript of the proceedings of the parliamentary commissioners in county Durham surviving in Durham cathedral library, and published by the Surtees Society in 1905. The persons named in these abstracts are not only the delinquents themselves, and those who succeeded them in their estates, but tenants, debtors and creditors, and local constables and officials of the committees.

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Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors
 (1648-1660)
Treasury Books (1702)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1702. Also includes Treasury minutes for early 1691; secret service accounts from 1689 to 1702, and accounts of the Civil List (royal expenditure) and army debts that had accumulated by the time of the death of king William III (8 March 1702).

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Treasury Books
 (1702)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Insolvents (1842)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1842)
Stockton-on-Tees Voters: Stockton Polling District (1868)
This poll book for the First Parliamentary Election for the Borough of Stockton-on-Tees lists the voters alphabetically by polling district, with full name (surname first) and address. In the right-hand column D represents the Liberal candidate, Joseph Dodds, Esq., and V the Conservative, Lord Ernest Vane Tempest. The three polling districts were Norton, Stockton (including so much of Linthorpe as lay within the parliamentary borough of Stockton), and Thurnaby. At the end of each district the handful of lodger voters are listed separately.

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Stockton-on-Tees Voters: Stockton Polling District
 (1868)
Stockton-on-Tees Voters: Thornaby Polling District (1868)
This poll book for the First Parliamentary Election for the Borough of Stockton-on-Tees lists the voters alphabetically by polling district, with full name (surname first) and address. In the right-hand column D represents the Liberal candidate, Joseph Dodds, Esq., and V the Conservative, Lord Ernest Vane Tempest. The three polling districts were Norton, Stockton (including so much of Linthorpe as lay within the parliamentary borough of Stockton), and Thurnaby. At the end of each district the handful of lodger voters are listed separately.

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Stockton-on-Tees Voters: Thornaby Polling District
 (1868)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, October to December 1881

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1881)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, January to March 1881

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1881)
Cases in Chancery (1883-1884)
Volume 76 of The Law Times, 'The Journal of The Law and The Lawyers', a weekly publication, runs from 3 November 1883 to 26 April 1884. Much of the journal is taken up with law reports, leading articles, &c., and the 'Solicitors' Department' contains several regular features of great interest. The court lists enable us to follow the progress of cases scheduled to be heard in the high courts. Many of these cases never actually came to be heard, litigation ceasing whilst in preparation, or being resolved 'at the door of the court'. In almost all cases the parties are referred to by surname only. The very extensive lists of cases pending for trial or hearing in the Chancery Division are arranged by the justice appointed, and then sub-divided into categories such as 'Causes for Trial with Witnesses', 'Further Consideration', 'Demurrer', 'Non-witness Causes, Adjourned Summonses, and Special Cases.'

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Cases in Chancery
 (1883-1884)
National ArchivesBritish artillerymen fighting in South Africa (1899-1902)
The Queen Victoria's South Africa Medal was awarded (after her death, in the event) to all who had served honourably in the various campaigns in the Boer War. Returns were made from each unit, and consolidated into nominal roll, of which this is the one for the Royal Artillery. Confusingly, the ledgers used had originally been printed for a register of men transferred (or re-transferred after mobilization) to 1st Class Army Reserve. All the original column headings were therefore struck through, and the roll was prepared with this information: Date of Issue; Regimental Number; Rank; Name; Unit; Medal (a 1 indicating that a medal was awarded); [number of] Clasps; the reference to the source in the original returns, usually starting with AG for papers in the hands of the Adjutant-General, and 68/Art/ for the Royal Artillery records. The final column, normally left blank, was occasionally used for explanatory remarks.

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British artillerymen fighting in South Africa
 (1899-1902)
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