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Bayn Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bayn'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Harthill wapentake (1380)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Market Weighton, Pocklington and South Cave.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Harthill wapentake
 (1380)
Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1471-1484)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of pope Sixtus IV. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic. Sixtus IV was consecrated and crowned 25 August 1471 (the day from which his pontificate is dated) and died at Rome 12 August 1484. The extracts were made by J. A. Twemlow from Vatican Regesta dxlvi to dclxxxi and Lateran Regesta dccxiii to dcccxxxviii, and published in 1955. Not all the Lateran registers survive from this pontificate, but were still in existence in the 18th century, when indexes were compiled giving rubricelle, or brief summaries of the papal bulls; nor, indeed, have all these indexes now survived, but Twemlow added an appendix listing all the rubricelle relating to the British Isles extant for the reign of Sixtus IV.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1471-1484)
Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims (1464-1524)
Criminals could evade pursuit by claiming sanctuary in Durham Cathedral. Persons who took refuge fled to the north door of the cathedral, and knocked for admission. There were two chambers over the door in which men slept, for the purpose of admitting fugitives at any hour of the night. As soon as anyone was so admitted, the Galilee bell was immediately tolled, to give notice that someone had taken sanctuary. The offender was required to declare before witnesses the nature of his offence, and to toll a bell in token of his demanding the privilege of sanctuary. He was then provided with a gown of black cloth with a yellow cross, called St Cuthbert's Cross, upon the left shoulder. A grate was provided near the south door to sleep upon, and for 37 days sufficient provisions and bedding were provided. But within 40 days he had to appear before the coroner, clothed in sackcloth, and be branded on his right hand with the sign of the letter A. This signified that he was swearing to abjure the realm: he was then free to leave the country unhindered. The petitions for immunity were entered in the diocesan registers, usually with the marginal note 'Peticio Immunitatis': those from 18 June 1464 to 10 September 1524 (the privilege was finally abolished in 1624) were edited and printed by the Surtees Society in 1837 under the title Sanctuarium Dunelmense. Some of the criminals came from a considerable distance: the great majority were murderers or homicides. Each entry usually gives full name, original address, (often) trade, a brief description of the crime, often with date, and usually the name of the victim, as well as the witnesses to the petition. This index covers all the surnames given.

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Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims
 (1464-1524)
Murderers sheltering in Beverley Minster: and their victims (1478-1539)
Criminals could evade pursuit by claiming sanctuary in the church of St John in Beverley, in the East Riding of Yorkshire. This liberty of the minster extended a league in every direction from the church door, and was divided into six sections, each giving greater sanctity to the rights of sanctuary, the sixth and innermost section being the presbitery or chancel. Near the altar there was a stone chair called the Frith Stool, seated on which an accused could claim total immunity. The bailiff would receive the oath of the fugitive, and a clerk recorded 'what man he killed, and wher with, and both ther namez'; the bailiff receiving a fee of 2s 4d, the clerk 4d. Sanctuary was afforded for 30 days, with food and lodging, after which the fugitive was protected to the borders of the county. But within 40 days he had to appear before the coroner, clothed in sackcloth, and be branded on his right hand with the sign of the letter A. This signified that he was swearing to abjure the realm: he was then free to leave the country unhindered. At Beverley the clerks kept a separate register of fugitives' petitions, which survives from 1478 to 1539 in Harleian Manuscript 560. It was edited and printed by the Surtees Society in 1837 under the title Sanctuarium Beverlacense. Some of the criminals came from a considerable distance: the great majority were murderers or homicides. Each entry usually gives full name, original address, (often) trade, a brief description of the crime, often with date, and usually the name of the victim. This index covers all the surnames given.

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Murderers sheltering in Beverley Minster: and their victims
 (1478-1539)
Knaresborough testators, legatees and witnesses (1510-1606)
Knaresborough in the West Riding of Yorkshire lay in the ancient diocese of York, but was part of a large separate probate jurisdiction or peculiar encompassing the parishes of Burton Leonard, Farnham cum Scotton, Fewston, Great Ouseburn, Hampsthwaite, Knaresborough, South Stainley, Staveley, and some small adjoining areas. Grants of probate and administration, as well as copies of wills, were recorded on the Knaresborough court rolls. Dr Francis Collins prepared abstracts of all enrolled wills, grants of administration, and of tuition, from the 2nd year of the reign of king Henry VIII to the 3rd and 4th of James I, 'no matter how insignificant in life the testator may have been or how uninteresting the will', and these were published by the Surtees Society in 1902.

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Knaresborough testators, legatees and witnesses
 (1510-1606)
Official Papers (1603-1610)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Scotland, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1603-1610)
Merchants and traders in Aberdeen (1399-1631)
A. M. Munro searched the council registers of the royal burgh of Aberdeen, and compiled this list of burgesses admited to the borough. The entries prior to 1591 were contained in lists engrossed in the council registers at the close of the minutes for the year ending at Michaelmas, but after that date in addition to the annual lists, which are continued, there is almost always a separate minute of admission under the respective dates. The records before 1591 are not only sparser, often with no more than a name, but are also lacking for 1401-1405, 1413-1432, 1434-1435, 1518-1519, 1557 and 1562-1564 - other blanks were filled in from the guildry accounts where such existed. Guild burgesses were allowed unfettered trading rights in Aberdeen; simple burgesses could only deal in Scottish wares (so being barred from the lucrative English and Flemish imports and exports); trade burgesses were limited to their own particular trades; and the council was able ex gratia to create honourary burgesses, who were accorded the full privileges of burgesses of guild and trade, and among whom numbered members of almost every family of note in Aberdeenshire. Burgesses could thus be created by descent, by apprenticeship into a trade, or ex gratia, and in the later portions of this roll the precise circumstances are usually given, sometimes also with the name of a cautioner or surety. Burgesses, masters and cautioners are all indexed here.

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Merchants and traders in Aberdeen
 (1399-1631)
Official Papers (1697)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1697)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
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