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Barrer Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'barrer'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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The English in France (1415-1416)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 3rd year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1415 to 20 March 1416) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883. The battle of Agincourt took place on 25 October 1415, so this roll has many letters of protection for soldiers, and various letters and orders relating to the ransoming of French prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1415-1416)
Traders in Canterbury (1392-1592)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, transcribed and privately printed in 1904 the lists of the Intrantes - those persons, not being free of the city, who paid the annual fine to trade - for the period 1392 to 1592. The names are arranged by ward (Burgate, Newyngate, Westgate, Worgate and Northgate, and give full name, (sometimes) occupation, and fee paid.

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Traders in Canterbury
 (1392-1592)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Devizes in Wiltshire (1720-1723)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1719. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered at Devizes in Wiltshire
 (1720-1723)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Hereford (1741-1745)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered at Hereford
 (1741-1745)
Members of London livery companies (1791-1797)
One of the most useful sections of the Universal British Directory, nominally produced in 1791 but including later material, is a List of the Livery of London, giving the names and addresses of members of the London livery companies, together with their professions. As a glance at the sample will show, the companies and the professions only sometimes match, so this is an invaluable key as a first step in tracing the relevant company records for a London trader of this period

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Members of London livery companies
 (1791-1797)
Inhabitants of London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet. Private Residences'. About 10,000 people are recorded.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1805)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. This section of the register (BT 112/2) covers numbers 1 to 2952 and 20200 to 23034, 5786 different entries, of men whose surnames began with the letters Ba. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
Members of Cambridge University (1935)
The Cambridge University Calendar for 1935-1936 includes this list of all living members of the university, i. e. not only undergraduates and members of staff, but also all surviving graduates from earlier generations. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname, then by college in order of foundation, and under the particular colleges by order of seniority of the B. A. degree. Surnames are given, initials, name of college, and then the years of graduating B. A. and M. A. Where a change of name had occurred since matriculation, the original name is inserted in brackets. For undergraduates the term of matriculation is given in square brackets with an M for Michaelmas, L for Lent or E for Easter. An asterisk before a surname indicates a member of the Senate. Names which appeared on the roll of the Regent House promulgated in November 1934 are marked with a dagger. Further degrees, such as PHD, MB, BCHIR, MD, &c. are listed in smaller capitals with the year conferred.

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Members of Cambridge University
 (1935)
Chemists (1950)
The Royal Institute of Chemistry was founded in 1877, and was open only to British subjects (and also, in due course, to citizens of the newly-created Republic of Ireland). Associates of the institute (A. R. I. C.) qualified either by studying chemistry, physics, mathematics and an optional science for the institute's examination (which insisted on a high standard of practical laboratory efficiency); or by obtaining good honours degrees or equivalent qualifications, with chemistry as principal subject, and having undergone training in allied sciences. Associates of at least three years' standing could then be admitted to the Fellowship (F. R. I. C.) either by taking a further examination in a special branch of chemistry, or by submitting the results of work or evidence of experience sufficient to justify the Council in granting exemption from such further examination. This register of fellows and associates, correct to 31 August 1950, contains 11,545 names, arranged alphabetically, surname first (in capitals), with qualifications, current address, telephone number, and (in italics) a brief description of present post in the chemical industry. Finally, year of admission as associate (A.) (and, where appropriate, fellow (F.) is given on the right-hand side. With this may appear the notation (x) for a fellow of the Chemical Society, (y) for a member of the Society of Chemical Industry, or (z) for a joint subscriber to all three chartered bodies.

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Chemists
 (1950)
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