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Barbot Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'barbot'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 34 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Oblata or Fine Rolls (1200-1216)
All the surviving oblata or fine rolls of the reign of king John were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Commissioners of the Public Records in 1835. These are the oblata rolls of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign, and the fine rolls of the 6th, 7th, 9th, 15th, 16th and 17th years. These rolls contain notices of the oblations or fines offered to the Crown to procure grants and confirmations of liberties and franchises of markets, fairs, parks and free warren; for exemption from tolls, pontage, passage and murage; to obtain justice and right; to stop, delay or expedite pleas, trials and judgments; and to remove suits and processes from inferior tribunals into the King's Court. Fines were also extracted for licence to trade, or permission to exercise commerce or industry of any kind, and to have the aid, protection, or goodwill of the King; to mitigate his anger or abate his displeasure; to be exempted from knighthood either for a term or for ever, and from attending the King in his foreign expeditions; they were also demanded for seisin or restitution of ancestral lands or chattels; for allowing delinquents to be replevied or bailed; for acquittal of murder; and for pardon of trespasses and misdemeanours; for the 'year and a day' of the lands and goods of felons and fugitives. Almost all entries have the county in question indicated in the left hand margin.

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Oblata or Fine Rolls
 (1200-1216)
Yorkshire Charters (1230-1239)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Yorkshire Charters
 (1230-1239)
Pipe Roll (1241-1242)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 26th year of the reign of king Henry III, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1241 to Michaelmas 1242. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons arising from the proceedings of the justices. The text was edited by Henry Lewin Cannon for Yale Historical Publications and printed in 1918. The name of the county is given at the head of each page, and variant spellings, omissions and additions found in the duplicate Chancellor's Roll [C. R.] are given in the footnotes.

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Pipe Roll
 (1241-1242)
Fine Rolls (1246-1272)
The fine rolls of the 31st to 57th years of the reign of king Henry III record part of the government administration in England. These excerpts from the rolls list in transcript applications by plaintiffs for various writs (such as 'ad terminum' and 'pone') and for assizes to be held by the justices in eyre to look into their grievances. A fine of half a mark (6s 8d) or a mark (13s 4d) was usually levied; the cases are normally identified by county, and record that the appropriate sheriff had been notified. There are also more extensive records, in which more detail is given. The excerpts were made by the Record Commission and printed in 1836.

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Fine Rolls
 (1246-1272)
Patent Rolls: entries for Nottinghamshire (1278-1279)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 7th year of king Edward I [20 November 1278 to 19 November 1279], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Nottinghamshire
 (1278-1279)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1275-1295)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1898. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1275-1295)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Strafforth wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Rotherham and Sheffield.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Strafforth wapentake
 (1379)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1413-1416)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign of king Henry V (21 March 1413 to 20 March 1416) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. C. Fowler, and published in 1910. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. The commissions of the peace issued for the English towns and counties and entered on the rolls, being largely repetitive, have been consolidated in a single appendix.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1413-1416)
The English in France (1418-1419)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 6th year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1418 to 20 March 1419) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883.

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The English in France
 (1418-1419)
Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

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Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
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