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Balsam Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'balsam'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire (1406-1535)
The Hospital of the Holy Cross was founded in 1269; in time this fraternity became a social and religious gild. 'The Register of the Gild of the Holy Cross, the Blessed Mary and St John the Baptist of Stratford-upon-Avon' was edited by J. Harvey Bloom, rector of Whitchurch, and printed in 1907. The register is a record of admissions to the gild, an account of the fines paid by new members, and the names of those in arrear. Each year's record usually starts on the Monday after Ascension Day (the sixth Thursday after Easter), when the new aldermen, master and proctors of the gild were elected, all duly named. Then follow the admissions to the gild, including payments for prayers and candles (lights) for the faithful dead; and the names of the sureties for these payments. Interspersed with this are occasional proclamations and memoranda concerning the fraternity. A peculiarity of this publication is that the years given at the head of each page (e. g. 1502-3) are those of the regnal year (in that case 18 Henry VII) in which the Monday after Ascension Day fell. The regnal years of Henry IV, Henry VI, Richard III and Henry VII all started after that day in the calendars of 1399, 1422, 1483 and 1485; so the gild registers during those years actually cover the following year to that shown in this printed text (in that case, 1503-4).

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Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire
 (1406-1535)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1645)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1645)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. This section of the register (BT 112/2) covers numbers 1 to 2952 and 20200 to 23034, 5786 different entries, of men whose surnames began with the letters Ba. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.

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London Policemen
 (1830-1842)
Gentlemen amateur rowers (1835-1851)
Rowing was one of the English sports covered in detail in the pages of Bell's Life in London, and from these was compiled a compendium called the Aquatic Oracle. The text is divided into two main parts: Gentlemen Amateurs and Watermen. All the entries are cross-referenced, and use these abbreviations: w., won; l., lost; b., beat; bn., beaten; sc. ma., scullers' match; o. ma., oars match; do. sc. ma., double scullers' match; 4 o.ma., 4 oars match; 8 o. ma., 8 oars match; sk., stroke; cox., coxswain; as., a side; Oxon., Oxonian; V. to P., Vauxhall to Putney; W. to P., Westminster to Putney; P. to M., Putney to Mortlake; M. to P., Mortlake to Putney; dis., distance.

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Gentlemen amateur rowers
 (1835-1851)
National ArchivesInhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851)
The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 30: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Nelson Place (East side), Salisbury Place (South side) from Nelson Place to Northampton Place, Northampton Place (both sides), North St. (both sides) and Nelsons Court". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 25 Nelsons Place; 10 to 34 Salisbury Place; 1 to 30 and 99 to 102 North Street (including Fleets Yard); 1 to 10 Northampton Place; 1 to 4 Northampton Buildings; 1 to 11 Nelsons Court; and Hawkesbury Cottage.

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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey
 (1851)
National ArchivesInhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851)
The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 10: described as: "London Road (south side), No 68 to No 1 and the Blind School - Albert Terrace - Gladstone St - Opposite Albert Terrace - Richmond Street - St George's Road (North side) including Preston House - Gladstone Place - Richmond Terrace - and West Place to the corner of Garden Row." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 68 London Road, Albert Arms, 1 to 5 Richmond Terrace, 1 to 26 Richmond Street, 1 to 16 Gladstone Street, 1 to 34 Albert Terrace, 1 to 4 West Place, 1 to 3 Richmond Place, 1 to 4 Gladstone Place, Preston House (St Georges Road) and the Blind School (London Road). The students at the Blind School are not included in this index.

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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey
 (1851)
Unclaimed Money and Property (1870)
Gun & Co. of 6 Prince of Wales' Road, London, in about 1870 published this fourth 'List of Next of Kin & Heirs, &c., who have been Advertised for in the English, Irish, Scotch, United States of America, Canadian, Australian, East and West Indian, and other Newspapers, since 1704. Money & Property to the value of many Millions Sterling want Claimants'. The list of 4,128 names gives surname, christian name, and, occasionally, locality. Copies of the actual advertisements were furnished to enquirers by the company at a cost of six shillings.

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Unclaimed Money and Property
 (1870)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1880)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1860, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1880)
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