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Askerne Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'askerne'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Pipe Roll (1201-1202)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. Two sets of pipe rolls were prepared, not exact duplicates, the main series being the Treasurer's or Exchequer rolls, the copies (of which fewer have survived) being the Chancellor's rolls. The Chancellor's roll (or Antigraphum) for the 3rd year of king John became separated from that series at some date, and found its way to the miscellaneous records in the Chapter House at Westminster. As it happens, the Chancellor's roll for that year is in a better state of preservation than the Treasurer's roll, so it was chosen for publication by the Commissioners on the Public Records of the Kingdom, by whom it was printed in extenso in 1833.

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Pipe Roll
 (1201-1202)
Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire (1266-1279)
The register of archbishop Walter Giffard of York, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, was edited by William Brown for the Surtees Society and published in 1904. The ancient diocese of York covered all of Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, as well as Lancashire north of the Ribble, southern Westmorland, and Hexhamshire in Northumberland. But there are few entries relating to the archdeaconry of Richmond, and few about the peculiar jurisdictions of Southwell, Ripon, Beverley and Hexham. The dioceses of Carlisle and Durham, both in the province of York, are hardly mentioned. Archbishop Giffard spent much of his pontificate away from his diocese, and the register has gaps: but at least it survives, unlike those for his immediate predecessors, Sewall de Boville (1256-1258) and Godfrey de Ludham (1258-1264). Moreover, there are ordination lists (pages 187 to 198) of acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests ordained in 1267 to 1274. These usually give full name, and indicate whether the man was 'religious' (a monk or friar), and whether his 'title' (sponsorship) arose from his own patrimony, but 'title' is not usually otherwise specified.

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire
 (1266-1279)
Pontefract Cartulary (1100-1300)
The Cluniac monastery of St John the Evangelist at Pontefract (Pomfret) in the West Riding of Yorkshire, was founded in the 11th century by Robert de Lascy. The grants of land made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which eventually came to Godfrey Wentworth of Woolley Park. This was edited by Richard Holmes and published by Yorkshire Archaeological Society in 1899 and 1902. The individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated: the numbering of the charters is modern, and amounts to 561. The cartulary itself contains 11 fasciculi, to which Holmes gave these section names - I. The Seigniorial Charters; II. The Ecclesiastical Charters; III. Royal Charters and Confirmations; IV. The Local Charters (Pontefract &c.); V. The Ledstone Charters; VI. The Ledsham Charters; VII. Miscellaneous Charters; VIII. The Peckfield and other Charters; IX. and X. Scarborough and other Charters; and XI. Leases to Tenants. Ledston(e), Ledsham and Peckfield are all close to Pontefract, as is most of the property.

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Pontefract Cartulary
 (1100-1300)
Inhabitants of London (1275-1312)
Letter Book B of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1275-1312)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Chancery Warrants (1244-1326)
Warrants were issued by the kings of England to the royal chancery: most of these warrants led to further proceedings which are recorded on the Charter Rolls, Patent Rolls, Fine Rolls, Close Rolls or the Inquisitions: but archivists have identified a large number of warrants for which there are no such equivalent records, and those for the reigns of Edward I and Edward II are gathered here. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but with occasional items referring to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Chancery Warrants
 (1244-1326)
Staffordshire entries on the Assize, De Banco and Fine Rolls (1307-1327)
Extracts of Staffordshire entries from these three series of records for the reign of king Edward II were made by Major-General the Hon. G. Wrottesley, and published by the William Salt Society in 1888. The justices in eyre (itinerant) holding assizes not only tried all civil actions outstanding on their advent, pleas of the crown and common pleas, but also interrogated the juries of each hundred and borough as to the Articles of the Eyre, inquiring into the king's proprietary rights, escheats, wardships, and questions of maladministration. The court of King's Bench (de Banco) sat in Westminster, similarly dealing with court cases brought in from throughout the country. The fine rolls record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. Wrottesley's extracts are far from exhaustive, as he confined his attention to those landed gentry families that he considered of importance.

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Staffordshire entries on the Assize, De Banco and Fine Rolls
 (1307-1327)
Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)
The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.

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Testators and legatees in London
 (1258-1358)
Wills proved at York: Names of Testators (1627-1637)
The diocese of York comprised most of Yorkshire, and Nottinghamshire: the York Exchequer court was the ordinary probate jurisdiction for the Yorkshire part of the diocese, but some wills from Nottinghamshire and other parts of the province of York were also proved there. Dr Francis Collins compiled this index to the transcribed wills of the Prerogative and Exchequer Courts in the York registry proved from 1627 to 1637. The date on the left is that of probate; the testator's full name is then given (surname first), parish or place of abode, and sometimes occupation, and date that the will was executed; and volume and folio number where it the transcript commences. The Act Books were used by Dr Collins to supply deficiencies in the information from the transcripts.

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Wills proved at York: Names of Testators
 (1627-1637)
London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1611-1660)
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