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Ansel Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'ansel'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 22 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Liberate Rolls (1245-1251)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 30th to 35th years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

ANSEL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Liberate Rolls
 (1245-1251)
Inhabitants of Leicester (1103-1327)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1899) of extracts from the earliest borough archives, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: the borough charters; the merchant gild rolls (from 1196 onwards); tax returns; court rolls (from about 1260 onwards); mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). The sample scan shows part of a gild entrance roll; those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but at this period the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for a loan for redemption of pontage and gavelpence of 1252-3 (pp. 44-46); five tallages of 1269 to 1271 brought together in a single table (128-145); and tallages of 1286 (208-211), 1307 (255-257), 1311 (272-274) and 1318 (310-313). The portmanmoot (or portmote) was the borough court dealing with minor infractions and civil suits. Finally, there is a calendar of charters (from c.1232 onwards, 381-400), and a list of mayors, bailiffs (reeves), receivers and serjeants (401-407).

ANSEL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1103-1327)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Masters of Merchantmen (1757)
The movements of British and foreign ships in Britain and abroad are recorded as Ship News in the London newspapers: these are the entries from January to June 1757.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1757)
Wandsworth Baptisms (1762)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.

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Wandsworth Baptisms
 (1762)
Gloucestershire Freeholders and Tenants: South Cerney (1776)
The election of a knight of the shire to represent the county of Gloucester in Parliament began 6 May and continued until 17 May 1776, the Hon. George Cranfield Berkeley and William Bromley Chester, esq., being the candidates. The franchise was for adult males possessing freehold worth 40s or more per annum. This poll book lists all voters, arranged by hundred and then by township according to the place where their freehold lay. The voter's full name is given (surname first); place of abode; of what the freehold consists (such as messuage and lands); in whose tenure; and how his vote was cast.

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Gloucestershire Freeholders and Tenants: South Cerney
 (1776)
Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1779)
The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.

ANSEL. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms
 (1779)
Inhabitants of the City of London (1780)
In August 1780 this loyal petition was made to king George III, subscribed by 2800 'Liverymen, Freemen, and Others, Inhabitants of the City of London', expressing grateful thanks 'for that Protection, which, by the Wisdom, Vigilance, and Activity of your Majesty in Council, was so seasonably given to us, at a Time when our Lives, Property, and every Thing dear to us, were in such imminent Danger, from the Violence of the most outrageous Banditti that ever existed.' This refers to the Gordon Riots, caused by a bill which Parliament introduced in 1778 to repeal certain harsh laws against Roman Catholics: in June 1780 a mob protesting against this repeal assembled in London, forced its way into the House of Commons, attacked Newgate prison releasing many prisoners, and destroyed a great deal of property, until dispersed by the military.

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Inhabitants of the City of London
 (1780)
English Civil Servants (1791)
Officers and officials of the various government departments, mostly in London, listed in the Universal British Directory. It includes the royal household, the departments of state, and public offices

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English Civil Servants
 (1791)
Inhabitants of Edmonton in Middlesex (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

ANSEL. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Inhabitants of Edmonton in Middlesex
 (1790-1797)
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