Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Anglin Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'anglin'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 32 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Open Access
Buying all 32 results of this search individually would cost £168.00. But you can have free access to all 32 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £68.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

City of Westminster Voters (1780)
The poll for the election of two citizens to serve in Parliament for the City and Liberty of Westminster was begun 7 September and ended 23 September 1780, the candidates being the Hon. Charles James Fox (F), Sir George Brydges Rodney, bart. (R), and the Right Hon. Thomas Pelham Clinton the Earl of Lincoln (L). In this poll book the names of all voters are given, by parish and within each parish by street, arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name, with the individual votes cast shown in the right hand columns. Pages 1 to 48 cover the parish of St George, Hanover Square; 49 to 100, St Martin; 101 to 134, St Clement and St Mary le Strand; 135 to 155, St Ann, Soho; 157 to 166, St Paul, Covent Garden; 167 to 170, St Martin le Grand; 171 to 224, St James; 225 to 274, St Margaret and St John.

ANGLIN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
City of Westminster Voters
 (1780)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices and clerks (1801)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1801. IR 1/38

ANGLIN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of apprentices and clerks
 (1801)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices and clerks (1804)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1804. IR 1/39

ANGLIN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of apprentices and clerks
 (1804)
Officers of the British Army (1832)
The annual Army List, published By Authority, first lists officers of the rank of major and above, by rank, and with dates of appointment to each successive higher rank; holders of crosses, crosses with clasps (with number of clasps indicated), medals, medals with clasps (with number of clasps indicated) are marked as such; and an ornate W indicates those officers actually present in any of the actions of 16, 17 or 18 June 1815 and therefore awarded the Waterloo Medal. For each officer in this section, the final column notes his then present or immediately former regiment and/or office, if any. Next, all the officers of the army are listed, down to the rank of ensign, by regiment or corps, giving rank, name, date of rank in the regiment, and date of rank in the army, with occasional further notes. Again, holders of medals are duly noted, as in the first list. For each regiment the paymaster, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon and assistant surgeons are named, as well as the civilian agent; and the regimental motto, battle honours, and colours of the facings and lace of the dress uniform are stated. After the British regiments of the line, the officers of the West India infantry, the Ceylon rifles, the Royal African Colonial Corps, the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the Royal Newfoundland Veterans, and the Royal Malta Fencibles are given; then the officers of the garrisons and other military establishments in Great Britain, Ireland, North America and Gibraltar (with Malta); the Royal Artillery; Commissariat Department; Medical Department; Chaplains' Department; officers retained on full pay; officers on British half pay; and officers on Foreign half pay (including the German Legion, the Brunswick Cavalry, the Brunswick Infantry, Chasseurs Brittaniques, Corsican Rangers, Dillon's Regiment, the Greek Light Infantry, Malta Regiment, Meuron's Regiment, Roll's Regiment, Sicilian Regiment, Watteville's Regiment, and the York Light Infantry Volunteers).

ANGLIN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Officers of the British Army
 (1832)
Officers of the British Army (1840)
The New Annual Army List, corrected to 7 February 1840, was published in London by Lieut. H. G. Hart. It lists all serving officers, first of all a list of General and Field Officers by rank from field marshal down to major; and then by regiment, including all ranks down to ensign, with paymasters, adjutants, quarter-masters, surgeons and assistant-surgeons. These lists are all annotated with dates of rank in the army and regiment, and with symbols indicating the officers present at Trafalgar (T), in the Peninsula or the South of France (P), and Waterloo (W). A superscript p indicates that the commission was purchased; an asterisk that it was temporary. The regiments and units are listed in order of precedence: Head Quarters staff; Life Guards; Horse Guards; 7 regiments of Dragoon Guards; 17 regiments of Dragoons; 98 regiments of Foot; the Rifle Brigade; two West India regiments of Foot; Ceylon Rifles; Royal African Colonial Corps; Cape Mounted Rifles; Royal Newfoundland Veterans; Royal Malta Fencibles; Recruiting Staff; Royal Artillery; Royal Engineers; Royal Marines; Commissariat; and the Medical Department.

ANGLIN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Officers of the British Army
 (1840)
Irish Insolvents (1844)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants

ANGLIN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Irish Insolvents
 (1844)
National ArchivesWestminster Workhouse Inmates (1851)
The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The Workhouse of Westminster St Margaret and St John the Evangelist was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Margaret; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were just three officers, and two members of their families; the institution held 594 inmates - 239 men and 355 women, but many of these served as staff for the general running of the workhouse. HO 107/1480

ANGLIN. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Westminster Workhouse Inmates
 (1851)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Bellerophon in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Bellerophon, a 78-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

ANGLIN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Bellerophon in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

ANGLIN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
Science Schools and Classes: Elementary Examination: Class Lists (1869)
The Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education published these class lists giving the names of all the successful candidates in the examination of science schools and classes taken in May 1869. The candidates were of three levels: honours; second stage or advanced examination; third stage or elementary examination. Twenty-three subjects were offered. These are the lists for the elementary examination. The tables, arranged subject by subject, give the candidate's full name (surname first), age, and occupation - or, in the case of those not yet of working age, father's occupation, preceded by (f.). Many candidates sat and were successful in more than one subject, and so appear in more than one list. The subjects are: I. Practical, Plane and Solid Geometry; II. Machine Construction; III. Building Construction; IV. Elementary Mathematics; V. Higher Mathematics; VI. Theoretical Mechanics; VII. Applied Mechanics; VIII. Acoustics, Light, and Heat: IX. Magnetism and Electricity; X. Inorganic Chemistry; XI. Organic Chemistry; XII. Geology; XIII. Mineralogy; XIV. Animal Physiology; XV. Zoology; XVI. Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology; XVII. Systematic and Economic Botany; XVIII. Mining; XIX. Metallurgy; XX. Navigation; XXI. Nautical Astronomy; XXII. Steam; XXIII. Physical Geography.

ANGLIN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Science Schools and Classes: Elementary Examination: Class Lists
 (1869)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.