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Amore Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'amore'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Inhabitants of Nottingham (1485-1547)
The muniments of the borough of Nottingham include extensive mediaeval archives. A selection from these from the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII was prepared and edited by W. H. Stevenson for the Corporation, and printed, with translations of the passages in Latin, in 1885. The principal sources used are the borough Court Books, largely dealing with civil cases, for which an almost complete series survives for this period; Sessions Rolls (92 survive for the two reigns), in which crimes and misdemeanours are recorded; a Mickletorn or Leet jury roll; detailed chamberlains' and bridge-wardens' accounts; and the Hall Books, or council minutes. There are lists of burgesses enrolled; bakers admitted to bake; and fines for licences to trade. A subsidy roll of 1523-4 lists householders by street, and there is an appendix of local deeds, including some material dating back to the 14th century.

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Inhabitants of Nottingham
 (1485-1547)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
House of Lords Proceedings (1692-1693)
Private bills dealing with divorce, disputed and entailed estates: petitions, reports and commissions: naturalisation proceedings.

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House of Lords Proceedings
 (1692-1693)
Inhabitants of Salisbury (1443-1704)
A collection of transcripts of churchwardens' accounts from the parishes of St Edmund and St Thomas in Sarum (Salisbury in Wiltshire) by Henry James Fowle Swayne, the Recorder of Wilton, was published by the Wilts Record Society in 1896. The greater part of these accounts relate to expenditure to workmen on the church fabric, and income for rent of pews and the tolling of bells and obsequies for parishioners. There are several sources covered: the churchwardens' accounts for St Edmund's for 1443 to 1461; for St Thomas's 1545 to 1690, and some notes from 1704; and accounts of the stewards of the Fraternity of Jesus Mass founded in St Edmund's.

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Inhabitants of Salisbury
 (1443-1704)
Inhabitants of Hastings in Sussex (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Hastings in Sussex
 (1790-1797)
Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by redemption.

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Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption
 (1392-1800)
Deaths, Marriages, Bankrupts, Dividends and Patents (1821)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, bankrupts and dividends, and patents, as reported in the Monthly Magazine or British Register. Includes some marriages and deaths from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, Bankrupts, Dividends and Patents
 (1821)
Money lenders and other creditors (1880)
Bills of sale transferred title in all property of a debtor to a specified creditor. Possession of a bill of sale thus protected a money lender or other creditor from losing a debtor's property to other creditors (except landlords) in case of insolvency or bankruptcy; and in many cases signing a bill of sale was a required step for a borrower securing a loan. The bill of sale specified the amount thereby secured, but could be open, i. e., allow for further drawings on the same account. Entries from the official register of bills of sales in England and Wales were published in Flint & Co.'s London Manchester and Dublin Mercantile Gazette, a weekly publication available only by subscription, issued under the motto "Security in Crediting". The entries are listed by county, then alphabetically by debtor, surname first, with address, trade, the name of the creditor ('in whose favour'), dates of issue and filing, and amount. An &c. after the amount indicates an open bill. The creditors that appear in the 'in whose favour' column are mainly, but not exclusively, loan companies and individual money lenders, and Jewish names figure prominently among the latter. When a loan was paid off, satisfaction of the bill of sale was entered on the register, and these satisfactions are also recorded in these pages. 1 January to 31 March 1880.

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Money lenders and other creditors
 (1880)
Squadron Leaders: General Duties Branch (Ground Section) (1957)
The Air Force List for 1957 contains gradation lists for all serving officers, corrected, generally, up to the appointments and promotions gazetted 2 April 1957. The officers are listed by branch, rank, and date of seniority; the names are given surname first, initials, decorations, and various sets of initials relating to their particular qualifications or expertise. A double-headed dagger before the name denotes a permanent direct commission; a dagger a national service commission; an asterisk some other non-permanent commission. The main abbreviations are: a. a., qualified at Army Long Gunnery Staff Course (A. A.); c. f. s., qualified flying instructor (with an asterisk if A1 category, without, A2); I, 1st class interpreter; i, 2nd class interpreter; i. d. c., completed a course at the Imperial Defence College; j. s. s. c., completed a course at the Joint Service Staff College; P, on probation; p. f. c., graduate of Pilot Flying College; p. s. a., graduate of R. A. F. Staff College; p. s. c., graduate of Military Staff College; q. s., R. A. F. graduate of the Military or Naval Staff College; Sp, medical or dental specialist; t. p., graduate of Empire Test Pilots' School; Z, qualified in A. I. S. Inspection Duties. In the Ground Section lists a further set of abbreviations, in bold in brackets in front of the names, identifies certain specialities - AcC, aircraft control; Bal, balloon; FC, fighter control; Ph, photographic; PhI, photographic interpretation; RS, radar supervisor.

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Squadron Leaders: General Duties Branch (Ground Section)
 (1957)
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