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Alett Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'alett'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 3 records (displaying 1 to 3): 

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Besiegers of Colchester (1648)
The siege of Colchester was one of the most severe of the Civil War, and lasted from 14 June to 28 August 1648. Kent and Essex Royalists on their way into Norfolk and Suffolk turned aside into Colchester, hoping to get recruits there. Fairfax pursued from his headquarters in London, and when on 12 June he appeared with 5,000 men they were obliged to make hasty preparations for defence. The town was ill-fitted to stand a siege, and the 4,000 Royalist troops were most of them newly levied and ill-armed, but after a repulse on 14 June 14, Fairfax realized that a long siege was inevitable, and busied himself with raising forts to completely isolate the town. On 2 July the work of circumvallation was finished, and though meeting with fierce resistance, Fairfax gained post after post. Early in August famine added to the misery of the besieged, and the citizens began to clamour for surrender. On 19 August, Norwich, the Royalist leader, asked for terms; negotiations went on for some days, and finally on 28 August, Fairfax occupied the town. Three of the Royalist leaders were shot, and the soldiers were sent to labour in the West Indies, or to enforced military service under the Venetian Republic. The townsmen were made to pay a heavy fine. These accounts list disbursements to workmen digging the fortifications and to artificers, soldiers and officers involved in the siege. The total sum paid was about 1,695.

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Besiegers of Colchester
London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

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London Marriage Allegations
Convicted Criminals (1762)
When Joseph Redington, Assistant Keeper of the Public Records, calendared the Home Office papers from the accession of king George III, 25 October 1760, to the end of 1765, he gathered together references to criminals from the State Papers Domestic, Warrant Books, and Criminal Papers, and these were printed in tabular form. The information is set out in four sections: - 1. Letters to Judges: giving name of the judge; name of the convict; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; date; page. 2. Petitions in Favour: stating from whom; name of convict; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; object of petition (such as pardon or commutation); date. 3. Reports or Certificates of the Judges, chiefly addressed to the king, on the Cases of Criminals: with name of judge; name of criminal; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; condition of pardon. 4. Warrants and Letters relating to Criminals convicted, being Pardons, Respites &c.: with nature of document; name of convict; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; date; page. The names of the criminals were not included in the printed index to the calendars, but we have now indexed them year by year.

ALETT. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Convicted Criminals
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