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Agnis Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'agnis'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1272-1281)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 1st to the 9th years of the reign of king Edward I (29 November 1272 to 17 November 1281) were edited for the Public Record Office by J. G. Black, and published in 1901. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1272-1281)
Official Papers (1644)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, as well as other miscellaneous records. These records are from January to September 1644: there is also a set of abstracts of navy correspondence.

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Official Papers
 (1644)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Essex (1741-1745)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered in Essex
 (1741-1745)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices and clerks (1802)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 2 June 1802. IR 1/38

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Masters of apprentices and clerks
 (1802)
Supporters of Sparrow, Hanbury & Co. Banks: Chelmsford &c. (1825)
Just before Christmas in 1825 a notice was issued, signed by local traders, assuring the public of the perfect soundness and stability of the banks of Sparrow, Hanbury & Co. in Essex, and stating their readiness to receive the notes of the same in all payments. The list of signatories is in five sections: Braintree, Bocking &c.; Bardfield, Finchingfield, Thaxted, &c.; Witham &c.; Coggeshall; and Chelmsford, &c.

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Supporters of Sparrow, Hanbury & Co. Banks: Chelmsford &c.
 (1825)
Maldon Poll: Voters Resident in Maldon and the country (1826)
On 7 June 1826 and the fourteen following days (Sundays excepted) a poll was held to elect Members of Parliament to represent the borough of Maldon in Essex. The candidates were the Hon. George Mark Arthur Way Allanson Winn (W) of Warley Lodge, who received 1747 votes; Thomas Barrett Lennard (L) esquire of Regent's Park, London, 1454 (or 1455) votes; and Quintin Dick (D) esquire of Curson Street, London, 1401. In all 3113 electors were polled, 2527 living in Maldon and the country, 586 in London and its environs. This poll book is divided into two sections, the 586 voters from London &c being listed separately. The names are listed alphabetically by surname, then christian name(s), occupation (in italics), address; and the right-hand column shows the votes cast. Those who did not vote are not listed.

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Maldon Poll: Voters Resident in Maldon and the country
 (1826)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1838)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1838)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Albion in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Albion, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Albion in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
Gentry in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Court Directory', listing alphabetically by surname and christian name the upper class residents of the capital with their postal addresses. 'In order to afford space for the addresses, the abbreviation "esq." for esquire has no longer been appended to each name in the Court Directory. It should be understood that such should be added to the name of every gentleman in the following pages to which no inconsistent addition is affixed.' Decorations, honours &c. are generally given. Some gentlemen appear who are also listed (as professional men, &c.) in the commercial section. Those with second residences in the provinces usually have the country address given as well.

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Gentry in London
 (1856)
Officers of the British Army (1860)
The New Annual Army List first lists officers of the rank of major and above, by rank, and with dates of appointment to each successive higher rank, and (where appropriate) when placed on half pay. An asterisk indicates temporary rank; a superscript p shows that a commission was purchased; a dagger shows officers on the half pay of their last regimental commission. An ornate W indicates those officers actually present in any of the actions of 16, 17 or 18 June 1815 and therefore awarded the Waterloo Medal; P is put before the name of an officer who served in the Peninsula or the South of France; T for the Battle of Trafalgar; VC for the Victoria Cross. For each officer in this section, the final column notes his then present or immediately former regiment and/or office, if any. Next, all the officers of the army are listed, down to the rank of ensign, by regiment or corps, giving rank, name, date of rank in the regiment, and date of rank in the army, with occasional further notes. Again, holders of medals are duly noted, as in the first list. For each regiment the paymaster, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon and assistant surgeons are named, as well as the civilian agent; and the regimental motto, battle honours, and colours of the facings and lace of the dress uniform are stated. After the British regiments of the line, the Rifle Brigade, the officers of the West India infantry, the Ceylon rifles, the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the Royal Canadian Rifles, St Helena Regiment and the Gold Coast Artillery Corps are given; then the officers of the garrisons and other military establishments; the Royal Artillery; Royal Engineers; Royal Marines; Commissariat Department; Medical Department; Staff Officers of Pensioners; Chaplains' Department; Staff (of Great Britain, Australia, Bahamas, Bermuda, British Columbia, Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, East Indies, Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Heligoland, Hong Kong, Ionian Islands, Jamaica (including Honduras), Malta, Mauritius, Newfoundland, North America, St Helena, the Western Coast of Africa, and the Windward and Leeward Islands); Military and Civil Department; and Barrack Masters. Then there is a separate list of officers retained on retired full pay and half pay (including the German Legion, the Brunswick Cavalry, the Brunswick Infantry, Chasseurs Brittaniques, Royal Corsican Rangers, the Greek Light Infantry, Royal Malta Regiment, Meuron's Regiment, Roll's Regiment, Sicilian Regiment, Watteville's Regiment, the York Light Infantry Volunteers, Foreign Veteran Battalion and the Foreign Corps of Waggoners).

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Officers of the British Army
 (1860)
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