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Aberdour Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'aberdour'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Douglas family charters (1150-1400)
The register of the more ancient writs of the Douglases of Dalkeith, Midlothian, Earls of Morton is probably the oldest chartulary of lay possessions in Scotland, and contains about 300 charters. It was edited by C. Innes and published by the Bannatyne Club in 1853 as part II of the Registrum Honoris de Morton. The names that occur are principally those of grantors, grantees and witnesses, mostly from Midlothian.

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Douglas family charters
 (1150-1400)
Inhabitants of Aberdeen (1398-1570)
Extracts from the first 27 surviving volumes of Aberdeen burgh (borough) records were made by John Stuart for the Spalding Club and published in 1844. Although it is believed that the town records were preserved on parchment rolls until about 1380, and in book form thereafter, by 1591 the town clerk remarked that there existed of the earliest records only 'peces and partis of four ald imperfyt and informall buikis conumitt and eitten be mothes, for aldnes and antiquite euill to be red, yit to be keipit for a monument be resoun of the antiquite'. The regular series of books surviving comprised 61 folio volumes from 1398 to 1745, and these contained the proceedings of the Council of the Burgh, of the Baillie Court, and the Guild Court.

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Inhabitants of Aberdeen
 (1398-1570)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1592-1599)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from August 1592 to May 1599, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1882. The publication brings together the contents of the principal register (Acta Secreti Concilii) with acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp 561-730); Acts and Ordinances relating to the Borders and the North (731-748); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (749-769). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1592-1599)
Merchants and traders in Aberdeen (1399-1631)
A. M. Munro searched the council registers of the royal burgh of Aberdeen, and compiled this list of burgesses admited to the borough. The entries prior to 1591 were contained in lists engrossed in the council registers at the close of the minutes for the year ending at Michaelmas, but after that date in addition to the annual lists, which are continued, there is almost always a separate minute of admission under the respective dates. The records before 1591 are not only sparser, often with no more than a name, but are also lacking for 1401-1405, 1413-1432, 1434-1435, 1518-1519, 1557 and 1562-1564 - other blanks were filled in from the guildry accounts where such existed. Guild burgesses were allowed unfettered trading rights in Aberdeen; simple burgesses could only deal in Scottish wares (so being barred from the lucrative English and Flemish imports and exports); trade burgesses were limited to their own particular trades; and the council was able ex gratia to create honourary burgesses, who were accorded the full privileges of burgesses of guild and trade, and among whom numbered members of almost every family of note in Aberdeenshire. Burgesses could thus be created by descent, by apprenticeship into a trade, or ex gratia, and in the later portions of this roll the precise circumstances are usually given, sometimes also with the name of a cautioner or surety. Burgesses, masters and cautioners are all indexed here.

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Merchants and traders in Aberdeen
 (1399-1631)
National ArchivesSailors on board H. M. S. Alexander (1796-1798)
His Majesty's ship the Alexander took part in the destruction of the French fleet in Aboukir Bay at the mouth of the Nile ('the Battle of the Nile') on the evening of the 1st and morning of the 2nd August 1798. This is the muster book for 1 July to 31 August 1798: being a continuation book in a series covering wages and victualling from September 1796, it also includes the names of some men who had died, deserted or been discharged from the ship from then to July 1798. Of the ship's complement of 590, this index covers the sailors, volunteers, and boys, as well as the supernumeraries: but not the marines, or the French prisoners taken after the battle. Usually each man's entry gives his birthplace, and also his age on entering the ship.

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Sailors on board H. M. S. Alexander
 (1796-1798)
Inhabitants of London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet. Private Residences'. About 10,000 people are recorded.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1805)
London medical men (1805)
London fellows, candidates, licentiates, licentiates in midwifery and extra licentiates of the Royal College of Physicians, members of the Royal College of Surgeons, members of the Society of Apothecaries, and fellows of the Medical Society of London, as well as officers and council of the society, and vice-presidents, officers and medical assistants of the Royal Humane Society for the Restoration of Human Life, and the officers and directors of the Society for the Relief of Widows and Orphans of Medical Men in London and its Vicinity, are listed in Holden's Triennial Directory of 1805 to 1807.

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London medical men
 (1805)
Traders and professionals in London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet of Businesses, Professions, &c.': coverage is good; about 30,000 individuals are recorded.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1805)
Medical men (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists fellows, candidates, inceptor candidates, licentiates and extra-licentiates of the Royal College of Physicians (giving a general address for those outside London, a street address for those living in London); the council of the Royal College of Surgeons in London; and officials of the Society of Apothecaries of London.

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Medical men
 (1841)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the great bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1830-1842)
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