Sources 1850-1859

Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1515-1898)

The society of Merchant Adventurers of Newcastle-upon-Tyne consisted of those who had obtained freedom of the city (allowing them to trade there) by birth as a son of, or apprenticeship, to a freeman: and within that, freedom of one of the three 'trades', i. e. boothman, draper or mercer. F. W. Dendy prepared extracts from the merchant adventurers' records, the second volume, published by the Surtees Society in 1899 containing extracts from the minute books relating to the history of the merchants' court, an account of the long-standing dispute between the Newcastle company and the London company, some extracts relating to the relations between the Newcastle company and the Eastland Company (who had a monopoly of the trade with Russia and the Baltic), copies of the oaths used by the Newcastle company, the London company and the Eastland Company, and (pages 185 to 381) a list of the apprentices enrolled in, and of the freemen admitted to, the Newcastle company. This list is arranged in a table of seven columns: Name of Apprentice; Name of Father of Apprentice and Observations (particularly, instances where an apprentice is passed over to a new master during his apprenticeship); Master; Boothman (B.), Draper (D.) or Mercer (M.); Date of Indentures: Enrolment: Admission. All the dates are normalised to New Style, i. e. to the modern calendar. Finally, there is a list of sons and apprentices of members who, having thus acquired the right of freedom of the city, took up the freedom, but did not assume the freedom of any of the three trades. The index covers all the contents of the volume, not just the apprentice and freemen lists.
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Hertfordshire Sessions (1699-1850)

Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Rolls. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county, with presentments, petitions, and recognizances to appear as witnesses: many of the records concern the county authorities dealing with regulation of alehouses, religious conventicles, absence from church, highways, poaching, profanation of the Sabbath, exercising trades without due apprenticeship &c. Unlike the Sessions Books, the decisions of the justices are not recorded on the rolls, which serve more as a record of evidence and allegations. This is a calendar of abstracts of extracts: it is by no means a completely comprehensive record of the surviving Hertfordshire sessions rolls of the period, but coverage is good.
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Gentlemen amateur rowers (1835-1851)

Rowing was one of the English sports covered in detail in the pages of Bell's Life in London, and from these was compiled a compendium called the Aquatic Oracle. The text is divided into two main parts: Gentlemen Amateurs and Watermen. All the entries are cross-referenced, and use these abbreviations: w., won; l., lost; b., beat; bn., beaten; sc. ma., scullers' match; o. ma., oars match; do. sc. ma., double scullers' match; 4 o.ma., 4 oars match; 8 o. ma., 8 oars match; sk., stroke; cox., coxswain; as., a side; Oxon., Oxonian; V. to P., Vauxhall to Putney; W. to P., Westminster to Putney; P. to M., Putney to Mortlake; M. to P., Mortlake to Putney; dis., distance.
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Watermen rowers (1835-1851)

Rowing was one of the English sports covered in detail in the pages of Bell's Life in London, and from these was compiled a compendium called the Aquatic Oracle. The text is divided into two main parts: Gentlemen Amateurs and Watermen. All the entries are cross-referenced, and use these abbreviations: w., won; l., lost; b., beat; bn., beaten; sc. ma., scullers' match; o. ma., oars match; do. sc. ma., double scullers' match; 4 o.ma., 4 oars match; 8 o. ma., 8 oars match; sk., stroke; cox., coxswain; as., a side; Oxon., Oxonian; V. to P., Vauxhall to Putney; W. to P., Westminster to Putney; P. to M., Putney to Mortlake; M. to P., Mortlake to Putney; dis., distance.
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Nottingham borough officers and officials (1836-1900)

In 1956 this ninth and extra volume was added to the series called Nottingham Borough Records, containing precis of selections from the council and committee minutes for this period.
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Gravestones in the British New Cemetery, Sant Rocco, the Ionian Islands (1838-1864)

The Ionian Islands were occupied by British forces in 1809-1814, established as a British protectorate in 1815, and ceded to Greece in 1864. Otho Alexander, British Vice-Consul there, about 1900 transcribed the surviving legible inscriptions from the British New Cemetery at Sant Rocco, as well as those at Paxo and Santa Maura cemeteries.
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London Policemen (1843-1857)

The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.
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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)

The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.
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Men of the Lanarkshire Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War (1845-1870)

New Zealand War Medal roll for the 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot: for service in the New Zealand campaign: the rolls were compiled following a general order in 1869 and the medals were distributed in 1870. The regiment had been sent to Tasmania in 1842 and was moved to New Zealand in 1845; the men returned to their depot at Cork in Ireland, 29 May 1856. The main New Zealand campaign took place in 1863 to 1866, but in 1870 there remained some men in the regiment able to claim the medal on account of their service in New Zealand in 1845 to 1856.
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Outstanding British artillerymen (1849-1854)

Non-commissioned officers and men of the Royal Artillery discharged and recommended for medals and gratuities. The lists state rank, name, battalion or corps, date of recommendation, date awarded, and total length of service (in years and days), with length of foreign service (in years and months) and as serjeant and staff serjeant (in years and months). The lists themselves are basically of recommendations, then annotated to show award of medal and/or gratuity, which in most cases naturally followed. Where an award was not made, the reason is usually given: there is a column showing when the man became non-effective, through discharge, or had been deprived of the award for some reason. Where a man's name is crossed through it should not be assumed that he was deleted from the list: sometimes the name is crossed through when the medal has been dispatched. The final column on the right indicates whether the man was granted a pension on discharge. (The sample scan is from 1847)
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Classics students at Cambridge University (1850-1850)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within each class in order of score in the examination (students getting exactly equal marks are bracketed together with the note 'AEq.'). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. In each year two students were singled out for the Chancellor's Medals, and these are marked, (A) for senior, (B) for junior (or with a paragraph mark if adjudged of equal merit). At this period candidates for Honours in Classics were required to have obtained Honours in Mathematics: holders of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes, where they occur, are marked (1) for senior, and (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Civil law students at Cambridge University (1850-1850)

Examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of students with equal marks being bracketed together). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became judges, &c. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1850-1850)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together, with the word 'AEq.'). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. The Greek letter alpha is affixed to the names of those students who had gained first class results in the Classical Tripos; beta to those entered in the second class; and gamma to those entered in the third class. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1850-1850)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1850-1850)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
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Yeomanry and Militia Officers (1850-1850)

The Royal Military Calendar lists officers of the Yeomanry Cavalry and the Militia, the armed forces supporting the civil power in Britain and Ireland
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1850-1850)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, where a boarder, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Inhabitants of Ainsley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Alcester in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Allesley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Alne in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Alveston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Anstey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Arley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Arrow in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ashow in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Astley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Aston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Aston Cantlow in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Atherstone in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Atherstone-on-Stour in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Attleborough in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Austrey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Avon Dassett in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Baddesley Ensor in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Baginton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Barcheston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Barford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Barston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Barton-on-the-Heath in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Baxterley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bearley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Beaudesert in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bedworth in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bentley in Worcestershire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bentley by Shustoke in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Berkswell in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bickenhill in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bidford-on-Avon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Billesley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bilton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Binley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Binton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.789 bennett dupuis edkins emms fenemore osborn vincent walton canning fisher jackson lowe dwig
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Inhabitants of Birdingbury in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Carriers to and from Birmingham (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. Birmingham is big enough not only to have separate alphabetical and trades listings, but also to include this compendium listing carriers running regular services to and from the town.
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Members of Birmingham Corporation (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. Birmingham has long alphabetical and trade lists, prefaced by these details of the corporation.
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Inhabitants of Birmingham (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. This long alphabetical section lists inhabitants of Birmingham.
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Inhabitants of Bishops Itchington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Blythe in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bolehall and Glascote in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bourton on Dunsmore in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Brailes in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Brinklow in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bubbenhall in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Budbrook in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bulkington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Burmington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Burton Dassett in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Burton Hastings in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Butler's Marston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Caldecote in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Castle Bromwich in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Chadshunt in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Charlecote in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Cherrington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Chesterton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Chilvers Coton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Church Lawford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Churchover in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Claverdon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Clifton on Dunsmore in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Coleshill in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Combe Abbey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Combrook in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Compton Verney in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Compton Wyniates in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Corley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Cosford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Coughton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Coventry Corporation (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. The alphabetical list for Coventry is preceded by this list of members of the corporation.
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Inhabitants of Coventry (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. This is the alphabetical section for Coventry.
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Inhabitants of Cubbington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Curdworth in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Dunchurch in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Eathorpe in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Eatington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Elmdon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Erdington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Exhall (near Coventry) in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Exhall (near Alcester) in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Farnborough in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Fenny Compton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Fillongley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Foleshill in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Frankton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Fulbrook in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Gaydon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Grandborough in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Great Packington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Great Wolford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Grendon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Great Harborough in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Halford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Hampton in Arden in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Hampton Lucy in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Harbury in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Hartshill in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Haseley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Haselor in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Hatton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Henley-in-Arden in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Hillmorton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Honiley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Honington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Hunningham in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Idlicote in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ilmington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ipsley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Kenilworth in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Keresley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Kineton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Kingsbury in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Kinwarton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Knowle in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ladbrooke in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Langley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Lapworth in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Lea Marston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Leamington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Leamington Hastings in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Leek Wootton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Lighthorne in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Lillington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Little Harborough in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Little Lawford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Little Packington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Little Wolford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Long Compton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Long Itchington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Long Lawford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Loxley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Mancetter in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Marton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Maxstoke in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Merevale in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Meriden in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Middleton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Milverton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Minworth in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Mollington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Monk's Kirby in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Moreton Morrell in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Morton Bagot in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Napton-on-the-Hill in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Nether Whitacre in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

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Inhabitants of Newbold-on-Avon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Newbold Pacey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Newnham Regis (King's Newnham) in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Newton Regis in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of No Man's Heath in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Norton Lindsey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Nuneaton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Nuthurst in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Offchurch in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Oversley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Over Whitacre in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Oxhill in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Packwood in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Pailton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Pillerton Hersey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Pillerton Priors in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Polesworth in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Preston Bagot in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Priors Hardwick in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Priors Marston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Radford Semele in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Radway in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ratley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Redditch in Worcestershire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Rowington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Rugby in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ryton on Dunsmore in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Salford Priors in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Saltley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Landed Gentry of Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. There is also this list of gentlemen's residences and their owners.
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Inhabitants of Seckington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Sheldon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Sherbourne in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Shilton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Shipston-on-Stour in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Shotswell in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Lower Shuckburgh (Shuckburgh Inferior) in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Upper Shuckburgh (Shuckburgh Superior) in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Shustoke (Shustock) in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Shuttington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Snitterfield in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Solihull in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Southam in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Sowe in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Spernall in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stivichall in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stockingford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stockton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stoke in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stoneleigh in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stratford-on-Avon (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stretton Baskerville in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stretton-on-Fosse in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stretton-under-Fosse in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Stretton on Dunsmore in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Studley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Sutton Coldfield in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Bishops Tachbrook in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Tamworth in Warwickshire and Staffordshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Tanworth in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Temple Balsall in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Temple Grafton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Tutnall and Cobley in Worcestershire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Tysoe in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ullenhall in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Upton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Walcott in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Walton D'Eiville in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wappenbury in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Ward End in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Warmington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Warwick Corporation (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. Before the alphabetical listing for Warwick, there is this list of members of the corporation.
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Inhabitants of Warwick (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wasperton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Watergall in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Water Orton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Webheath in Worcestershire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Weddington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Weethley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Welford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wellesbourne in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Weston-under-Wetherley in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Weston-on-Avon in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Whatcott in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Whichford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Whitchurch in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Whitnash in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Whittington in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wibtoft in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Willey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Willoughby in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wilnecote in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wishaw and Moxhull in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Withybrook in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Witton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wixford in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wolfhamcote in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wolston in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wolverton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wolvey in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wootton Wawen in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wormleighton in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wroxhall in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Inhabitants of Wyken in Warwickshire (1850-1850)

Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.
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Boys entering Crewkerne School (1850-1850)

Crewkerne Grammar School in Somerset was founded in 1499; as part of the quatercentenary celebrations a History of Crewkerne School, by the Reverend R. Grosvenor Bartelot, was published in 1899; and this included this school register from 1828 to 1899. Until 1877 only foundationers (day boys part of whose fees was paid out of the school foundation) are listed; thereafter boarders as well as day scholars. Names are arranged by date of entrance; surname is given first, then christian name, age at entry, date of entering, and date of leaving.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1850-1850)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1850-1850)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Rugby School (1850-1850)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1850-1850)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1850-1850)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Cheltenham College (1850-1850)

Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).
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Boys entering Elizabeth College, Guernsey (1850-1850)

Elizabeth College, Guernsey, was founded in 1563 and rechartered in 1825. Charles James Durand, Kentish Brock and Edward Charles Ozanne compiled this edition of the college register, published in 1898. The names are arranged by term of entering the school, with a sequential number, surname and christian names in bold: then place and date of birth, father's name or reference to a brother previously at the school; and year of leaving. Beneath that, in smaller type, the compilers put what they could glean about the boy's subsequent career.
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Boys entering Leeds Grammar School (1850-1850)

The admission books for Leeds Grammar School from 1820 to 1900 were edited by Edmund Wilson and published in 1906. The series of registers is almost complete for the period, there being in addition admission registers for the Lower (or Commercial) Department from 1856 to 1865, and lists of boys in the school in 1856, and in the Commercial Department in 1861. The entries are arranged by date or term of admission: a sequential number is given first, then surname, christian name, and, after a dash, father's christian name, occupation, and address; another dash, and then the age of the boy at admission, and often his year of leaving (with the abbreviation r. for 'removed' or 'left'). r.* means left without notice; (o) or S. or Stranger or Foreigner indicates a boy not on the foundation. The editor was unable to divine the meaning of the abbreviation (Q) or the asterisks prefixed to most entries in 1856 to 1860, but dutifully copies them into the text. In smaller type he then proceeds, where possible, to add some information about the boy's subsequent career.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1850-1850)

This First Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; and a synopsis of his career, so far as known.
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Boys entering Sedbergh School (1850-1850)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Boys entering Uppingham School (1850-1850)

The public school at Uppingham in Rutland was founded by Archdeacon Johnson in 1584. A roll of scholars from 1824 to 1905 was edited by J. P. Graham, and published in 1906. This was a revision and updating of an 1894 edition of the roll, the great bulk of the work having been done by Mrs Mullins. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy's name is given, surname first, with an asterisk where known (in 1906) to have died. Then there is month and year of birth, father's name (most often just surname and initials) and address (at entrance). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), that is indicated. After the month and year of leaving the school, there is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, address as in 1906.
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Anglican Schoolmasters (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Non-conformist Schoolmistresses (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Roman Catholic Schoolmistresses (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Church of Scotland Schoolmistresses (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Free Church of Scotland Schoolmistresses (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Anglican Schoolmistresses (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Non-conformist Schoolmasters (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Roman Catholic Schoolmasters (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Church of Scotland Schoolmasters (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Free Church of Scotland Schoolmasters (1850-1850)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.
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Assignments of bankrupts' estates in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignments of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date (in brackets), address and trade; followed by the names and addresses of the trustees to whom the estate was delivered, and the name and address of the solicitor. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Assignees of bankrupts' estates in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignees of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), and trade; followed by the names, addresses and trades of the assignees to whom the estate was delivered. This is the index to the names of the assignees, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Bankrupts in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.
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Bankrupt meeting strays (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. In descriptions of meetings as the case progressed the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to stray names in the bankruptcy meetings, of co-bankrupts, solicitors, &c., from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Dividends of insolvents' estates in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included brief notices of dividends of insolvents' estates. Each entry gives the year that the insolvency was first gazetted, the surname and initials of the bankrupt, trade and address; followed by the amount of the dividend as shillings and pence in the pound. This is the index to the names of the insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Insolvents imprisoned for debt in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included brief notices of insolvents' estates surrendered to assignees. Each entry gives the surname and christian name of the insolvent, trade and address, followed by the name of the prison. This is the index to the names of the insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Insolvents in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of insolvencies and stages in the process whereby the insolvents petitioned for release from debtors' prison. The insolvent is generally referred to by name (surname first), address and trade. This is the index to the names of the insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Assignments of bankrupts' estates in Ireland (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignments of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date (in brackets), address and trade; followed by the names and addresses of the trustees to whom the estate was delivered, and the name and address of the solicitor. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Irish Bankrupts (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of Irish bankrupts to surrender at the Court of Bankruptcy on Lower Ormond Quay. The initial entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), address and trade, often with the phrase dlr. and ch., for 'dealer and chapman'; the dates of the stages of the official surrender, the name and address of the agent and the date of the fiat. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Bankrupts in England and Wales petitioning for discharge (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. Towards the end of the process there was a Meeting for Allowance of Certificates, where the bankrupt applied for a certificate of discharge. This meeting sometimes took place many years after the bankruptcy procedure started: the details given are the year originally gazetted, name (surname first), address, and trade; and the date and time of the hearing. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of dissolutions of partnerships gazetted in England and Wales. The names of the partners are given in full, surnames in capitals, followed by trade and address, and date of the end of the partnership. Each entry usually ends with the phrase 'Debts by ...', indicating which partner intended to continue, and resume the responsibilities of, the business. This is the index to the names of the partners, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Scottish Bankrupts (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of sequestrations of Scottish bankrupts' estates. The initial entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), trade and address; the dates and place of the stages of the sequestration process, and the date by which claims against the estate were to be lodged. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Scottish Partnerships Dissolved &c. (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of sequestrations of Scottish bankrupts' estates, and partnerships dissolved. This is the index to the names of the partners, together with various stray names from the bankruptcy notices, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Trustees and solicitors in England and Wales (1850-1850)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignments of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date (in brackets), address and trade; followed by the names and addresses of the trustees to whom the estate was delivered, and the name and address of the solicitor. This is the index to the names of the trustees and solicitors, from the issues from January to December 1850.
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Boys entering Tonbridge School (1850-1850)

W. O. Hughes-Hughes, late Assistant-Master of Tonbridge School, prepared this edition of the school register. The Kent grammar school was founded by royal charter in 1553, but the surviving register commences with the names of 69 boys called over on Skinners' Day 1826. After that they are arranged alphabetically by quarter to 1833, and thereafter by term of entry. Each entry gives, where known: the boy's surname (in capitals) and full christian name(s); the years when at the school; father's name; year of birth; school honours; and a resume of his subsequent career.
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Printer elected to a pension (1850-1850)

The Printers' Pension Society was formed 3 December 1827 for 'the relief of aged, infirm, and distressed workmen, and their widows, in the several branches of the printing trade'. This list of pensioners elected through to December 1881 sets out in tabular form sequential number; year of election; full name (surname first); occupation (such as compositor, pressman, warehouseman, &c.); age at election; total amount paid (to December 1881 where still then living); and year of decease. The names of pensioners still alive at the end of 1881 are given in italics. The final column gives the number of husband or of widow in those cases where the spouse appears elsewhere in the list.
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Printer's widow elected to a pension (1850-1850)

The Printers' Pension Society was formed 3 December 1827 for 'the relief of aged, infirm, and distressed workmen, and their widows, in the several branches of the printing trade'. This list of pensioners elected through to December 1881 sets out in tabular form sequential number; year of election; full name (surname first); occupation (such as compositor, pressman, warehouseman, &c.); age at election; total amount paid (to December 1881 where still then living); and year of decease. The names of pensioners still alive at the end of 1881 are given in italics. The final column gives the number of husband or of widow in those cases where the spouse appears elsewhere in the list.
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London Missionary Contributions: Albany Chapel, Camberwell (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Albion Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Barbican (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Barnsbury Chapel, Islington (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Broad Street (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Buckingham Chapel, Pimlico (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Camberwell (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Clapham (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Claremont Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Coverdale Chapel, Limehouse (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Craven Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Ebenezer Chapel, Bermondsey (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Falcon Square (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Fetter Lane (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Finsbury (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Hanover Chapel, Peckham (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Hare Court (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Haverstock Hill (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Holloway (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Holywell Mount (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Hoxton (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Islington Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Jamaica Row (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Kensington (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Kingsland (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Latimer Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Lower Street, Islington (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Maberly Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Mile End New Town (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: New Court, Carey Street (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Old Gravel Pit, Homerton (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Orange Street (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Paddington Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Poultry Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Queen Street, Ratcliffe (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Robert Street, Grosvenor Square (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Spa Fields (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: St John's Chapel, Walworth (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: St Thomas's Square, Hackney (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Stepney (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Stockwell (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Surrey Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Tabernacle (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Tottenham Court Road (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Trevor Chapel (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Trinity Chapel, Brixton (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Trinity Chapel, Poplar (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Union Chapel, Islington (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Union Street, Southwark (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Walthamstow (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: Walworth (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: York Road (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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London Missionary Contributions: York Street, Walworth (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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Inhabitants of Liverpool (1850-1850)

Over 1600 inhabitants of Liverpool signed this petition to the Mayor, 14 November 1850, to 'call a Public Meeting, for the purpose of adopting an Address to the Queen, praying her Majesty to take such steps as may be deemed necessary to maintain the prerogative of the Crown against all Papal aggression.'
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Mauritius Intestates (1850-1850)

Return of certain estates under charge of the Curator of Intestate Estates, at Mauritius, on 31 December 1850, giving name of the intestate or party whose estate was vacant; date of intestate's decease; colonial residence; supposed British or foreign residence; money in hand; and remarks. The sample scan is from a return of estates of intestates from the Supreme Court of the colony of Victoria of 1859.
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New South Wales Intestates (1850-1850)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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New Zealand Intestates (1850-1850)

The probate courts of the Australasian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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New South Wales District of Port Phillip (Victoria) Intestates (1850-1850)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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South Australia Intestates (1850-1850)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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Van Diemen's Land Intestates (1850-1850)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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Bedfordshire Missionary Contributions: Ampthill and Maulden (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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Bedfordshire Missionary Contributions: Bedford (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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Bedfordshire Missionary Contributions: Luton (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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Bedfordshire Missionary Contributions: Roxton (1850-1850)

The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850.
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Students entering the Albert National Agricultural Training Institution, Dublin (1850-1850)

This register of internal students gives full name; date of entry; date of leaving; time spent at the institution (in years and months); and, particularly interesting, 'destination of leaving' - such as 'Teacher in Tullamore Workhouse School', 'Emigrated to America', 'Agriculturist at Dunmanway'.
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Boys Admitted to Wanstead Infant Orphan Asylum (1850-1850)

At a general court of the governors of Wanstead Infant Orphan Asylum, held 27 November 1850, at the London Tavern, forty children (twenty boys, twenty girls) were elected to receive the benefits of the institution. The list of the successful candidates gives full names (initials only for middle names) and the number of votes received. The votes of unsuccessful candidates still eligible by the rules were carried forward to the next election, to be held on the last Wednesday in May.
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Girls Admitted to Wanstead Infant Orphan Asylum (1850-1850)

At a general court of the governors of Wanstead Infant Orphan Asylum, held 27 November 1850, at the London Tavern, forty children (twenty boys, twenty girls) were elected to receive the benefits of the institution. The list of the successful candidates gives full names (initials only for middle names) and the number of votes received. The votes of unsuccessful candidates still eligible by the rules were carried forward to the next election, to be held on the last Wednesday in May.
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Consistory Court of London Divorce Cases (1850-1850)

The list of causes of divorce determined in the Consistory Court of London gives the title of the cause; whether opposed or unopposed; whether promoted by husband or wife; whether for adultery and cruelty, or which; when commenced; when concluded; whether appealed or not; whether carried to the House of Lords.
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Masters in the Merchant Service, First Class (1850-1850)

Masters in the Merchant Service who voluntarily passed an examination and obtained certificates of qualification under the regulations issued by the Board of Trade, from 28 February to 11 April 1850.
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Masters in the Merchant Service, Second Class (1850-1850)

Masters in the Merchant Service who voluntarily passed an examination and obtained certificates of qualification under the regulations issued by the Board of Trade, from 28 February to 11 April 1850.
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Masters in the Merchant Service, Third Class (1850-1850)

Masters in the Merchant Service who voluntarily passed an examination and obtained certificates of qualification under the regulations issued by the Board of Trade, from 28 February to 11 April 1850.
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Mates in the Merchant Service, First Class (1850-1850)

Mates in the Merchant Service who voluntarily passed an examination and obtained certificates of qualification under the regulations issued by the Board of Trade, from 28 February to 11 April 1850.
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Mates in the Merchant Service, Second Class (1850-1850)

Mates in the Merchant Service who voluntarily passed an examination and obtained certificates of qualification under the regulations issued by the Board of Trade, from 28 February to 11 April 1850.
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Mates in the Merchant Service, Third Class (1850-1850)

Mates in the Merchant Service who voluntarily passed an examination and obtained certificates of qualification under the regulations issued by the Board of Trade, from 28 February to 11 April 1850.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1850-1854)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Gravestones in Paxo Cemetery in the Ionian Islands (1850-1859)

The Ionian Islands were occupied by British forces in 1809-1814, established as a British protectorate in 1815, and ceded to Greece in 1864. Otho Alexander, British Vice-Consul there, about 1900 transcribed the surviving legible inscriptions from the British New Cemetery at Sant Rocco, as well as those at Paxo and Santa Maura cemeteries.
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Gravestones in Santa Maura Cemetery in the Ionian Islands (1850-1859)

The Ionian Islands were occupied by British forces in 1809-1814, established as a British protectorate in 1815, and ceded to Greece in 1864. Otho Alexander, British Vice-Consul there, about 1900 transcribed the surviving legible inscriptions from the British New Cemetery at Sant Rocco, as well as those at Paxo and Santa Maura cemeteries.
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Gravestones in the British New Cemetery, Sant Rocco, the Ionian Islands (1850-1859)

The Ionian Islands were occupied by British forces in 1809-1814, established as a British protectorate in 1815, and ceded to Greece in 1864. Otho Alexander, British Vice-Consul there, about 1900 transcribed the surviving legible inscriptions from the British New Cemetery at Sant Rocco, as well as those at Paxo and Santa Maura cemeteries.
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Gravestones in the British New Cemetery, Sant Rocco, the Ionian Islands (1850-1869)

The Ionian Islands were occupied by British forces in 1809-1814, established as a British protectorate in 1815, and ceded to Greece in 1864. Otho Alexander, British Vice-Consul there, about 1900 transcribed the surviving legible inscriptions from the British New Cemetery at Sant Rocco, as well as those at Paxo and Santa Maura cemeteries.
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Classics students at Cambridge University (1851-1851)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within First and Second Class in order of score in the examination (students getting exactly equal marks are bracketed together with the note 'AEq.'). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. In each year two students were singled out for the Chancellor's Medals, and these are marked, (A) for senior, (B) for junior (or with a paragraph mark if adjudged of equal merit). These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Civil law students at Cambridge University (1851-1851)

Examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of students with equal marks being bracketed together). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became judges, &c. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1851-1851)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together, with the word 'AEq.'). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. The Greek letter alpha is affixed to the names of those students who had gained first class results in the Classical Tripos; beta to those entered in the second class; and gamma to those entered in the third class. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Moral Sciences students at Cambridge University (1851-1851)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First and Second), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Natural Sciences students at Cambridge University (1851-1851)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First and Second), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1851-1851)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for April 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for August 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for December 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for February 1851.
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for January 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for July 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for June 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for March 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for May 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for November 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for October 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851-1851)

The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for September 1851. (The sample scan is from February)
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Almsmen and almswomen of St Peter's Hospital in Southwark, Surrey (1851-1851)

St Peter's Hospital, St Georges Road, Southwark, acted as almshouses for the elderly.
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Staff of the Bethlem in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for the Royal Hospital of Bethlehem or Bethlem, founded by Edward VI for the cure of poor lunatics. The hospital lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, in St Jude ecclesiastical district.
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Blind students in Southwark, Surrey (1851-1851)

Blind children and adults from all over England came to the School for the Indigent Blind in London Road, Southwark to learn crafts such as basket making and weaving. This is the census of those boarding there on the night of 30 March 1851. Students were instructed by oral information, and by books in raised or embossed letters; and were taught a trade, to enable them to procure their own living. Candidates were admitted by votes of subscribers, and had to be between the ages of 10 and 25.
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Dissolutes under correction in Surrey and their attendants (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for the Bridewell, founded by Henry VIII for the correction and reform of the dissolute. The institution lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, in St Jude ecclesiastical district.
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Students of the British and Foreign School in Southwark, Surrey (1851-1851)

The British and Foreign School for the Scriptural Education of the Children of the Poor of Every Religious Persuasion was based at Great Union Street in Southwark, and had a number of male and female student boarders, found here on the night of 30 March 1851, at the taking of the decennial census.
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Criminal lunatics in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for the Royal Hospital of Bethlehem or Bethlem, founded by Edward VI for the cure of poor lunatics. The hospital lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, in St Jude ecclesiastical district. The return of patients was divided into three sections: curable, incurable and criminal lunatics. This index covers the criminal.
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Curable lunatics in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for the Royal Hospital of Bethlehem or Bethlem, founded by Edward VI for the cure of poor lunatics. The hospital lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, in St Jude ecclesiastical district. The return of patients was divided into three sections: curable, incurable and criminal lunatics. This index covers the curable.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 1: described as: "Bridge House Place, commencing at No 1 to the end - Borough Road (left hand) to the corner, Cuthbertson's - Southwark Bridge Road (left hand) to the house beyond Clark's Timber Yard - The opposite side of Southwark Bridge Road No 172 to Broom's Yard inclusive and both sides of Great Union Street from Southwark Bridge Road to Bridge House Place". This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 52 Bridge House Place, 1 to 13 Borough Road (including Stones End, Portland Place and Atlas Works), 1 to 30 and 156 to 172 Southwark Bridge Road (including Brooms Yard), 1 to 19 Great Union Street.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 10: described as: "London Road (south side), No 68 to No 1 and the Blind School - Albert Terrace - Gladstone St - Opposite Albert Terrace - Richmond Street - St George's Road (North side) including Preston House - Gladstone Place - Richmond Terrace - and West Place to the corner of Garden Row." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 68 London Road, Albert Arms, 1 to 5 Richmond Terrace, 1 to 26 Richmond Street, 1 to 16 Gladstone Street, 1 to 34 Albert Terrace, 1 to 4 West Place, 1 to 3 Richmond Place, 1 to 4 Gladstone Place, Preston House (St Georges Road) and the Blind School (London Road). The students at the Blind School are not included in this index.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 11: described as: "Saint George's Circus No 7 (Langs) to No 96 Blackfriars Road and the Magdalen Hospital - Wirtemberg Place - Valentine Place (both sides) - Angel Place to railing - Pontipool Pl - and both sides of Gray Street." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 7 Saint Georges Circus, 96 to 124 Blackfriars Road (including Magdalen Hospital), 3 to 10 Wirtemburgh (sic) Place, 1 to 35 Valentine Place, 1 to 7 Pontipool Place, 1 to 29 Angel Place, and 2 to 41 Grey (sic) Street (including John O Groates). The unmarried housemaids in the Magdalen Hospital for the Reception, Maintenance and Employment of Penitent Females are only identified by initials, and so are not covered by this index.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 12: described as: "Webber St (north side) No 19 (Pidmores) to No 1a next the Assembly Rooms - Valentine Row No 1 (Percivals) to No 18 - Angel Place, No 1 to No 15 (to railing) - Webber St (south side) from Riding School to Sturrack's inclusive - Webber Row (both sides) No 30 to Waterloo Road including Pape's Court - Cottage Gardens - Spiller's Court - Hedger's Court - Grotto Place & Gardens - and Williams Court." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 19 Webber Street, 1 Grey Street, 1 to 18 Valentine Row, 1 to 12 Angel Place, 1 to 6 Webber Street South, 1 to 47 Webber Row (various numbers), 1 to 4 and 48 and 49 Pape's Buildings, 1 to 4 Cottage Gardens, 1 to 8 Spiller's Court, 1 to 8 Hedger's Court, 1 to 6 Grotto Place, 7 Grotto Gardens, and 2 to 8 William's Court.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 13: described as: "Johnston's Buildings - Obelisk Yard - Waterloo Road (east side) to Munroe's, end of Parish (West side) commencing at the Cabinet Maker's corner of Whiting St to Procters, end of Road - Duke St (north side) from Locksmith's to No 49 and Bale's Court." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 4 Johnston's Buildings, 1 to 18 Obelisk Yard, 1 to 6 Obelisk Buildings, 1 to 15 James Terrace, 1 to 10 Brighton Place, 1 to 6 Haddow Place, 1 to 5 Oxford Place, 2 to 22, 34 to 36 and 81 to 85 Waterloo Road, 29 to 35 Oxford Terrace, The George, 1 to 5 Paget Place, 49 to 75 Duke Street, and 2 to 3 Bales Court.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 14: described as: "Duke Street, No 2 next the 'Oxford Arms' to Tower St and the opposite side of Little Duke Street to Webber Row - George Court and Pierce Court - Webber Row or Street (both sides) from the Waterloo Road to the Westminster Road - Elizabeth Place and Ann's Place." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 2 to 28 Duke Street, 26 to 46 Little Duke Street, 1 to 4 George Court, 39 and a half, 40 and a half, 41 and a half, 1 and 2 Pearce Court, 51 to 54 and 88 to 95 Webber Row, 55 to 87 Webber Street, 1 to 20 Elizabeth Place, and 3 to 16 Ann's Place.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 15: described as: "Webber Street commencing at Wood's (corner of Webber Row) to Ross's the end of Parish - Barron's Place (both sides) - John's Buildings - Herbert's Buildings - Chester Place - Barron's Court - Laurie Terrace - Barkham Terrace - King Edward Street (both sides) - and Yorkshire School." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 6 and 20 Webber Street, 1 to 28 Herbert's Buildings, Half Way House, 1 to 7 Johns Terrace, 1 to 20 Barrons Place, 1 to 8 Johns Buildings, 1 to 5 Chester Place, 1 to 6 Barron's Court, 1 to 23 Laurie Terrace, 1 to 17 Barkham Terrace (with East Lodge and West Lodge), 1 to 11 King Edward Street, 1 to 16 Price's Terrace, and the Yorkshire Society's School (Westminster Road).
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 16: described as: "Tower Street (both sides) - Short Street - Gloucester Street - Gilbert's Court - Gilberts Passage and Westminster Road No 8 Gilberts Buildings (two doors past the 'Tower') to the corner of the Waterloo Road consisting of Melina Place - Melina Buildings - Elizabeth Place - Oxford Place and the Freemasons' School." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 8 to 10 Gilbert's Buildings, 2 to 82 Tower Street (including the police station), 2 and 3 Short Street, 2 and 30 Gloucester Street, 2 to 7 Gilberts Court, 42 Gilberts Passage, 4 to 17 Melina Place, 1 to 4 Melina Buildings, 1 to 4 Elizabeth Place, 1 to 3 Oxford Place, Oxford Arms, and Freemasons School.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 17: described as: "Charles Street (both sides) & House back of No 4 - Charles Place - South side of Westminster Road commencing at Catholic Chapel & including Princess Place, Asylum Buildings, Lee's Place & Hatfield Pl to the Crown inclusive - Lambeth Road to the Catholic Chapel & both sides of Joiner Street." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 29 Charles Street, 1 to 4 Charles Place, The Joiners Arms, 1 to 3 Joiners Place, 1 to 15 and 19 to 34 Joiner Street, St Georges Catholic Chapel, 1 to 5 Princess Place, 1 to 4 Asylum Buildings, 1 to 9 Hatfield Place, St Georges Circus (Crown Tavern), 1 to 7 Lees Place and 1 to 24 Lambeth Road.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 2: described as: "Southwark Bridge Road commencing at Union Place, then Stanhope Place - Chester Terrace - both sides of Great Union Street to Nicholl's (baker) inclusive - British & Foreign School to Grosvenor Place, inclusive - Market Street (left hand) to Earl Street - Bond Street (both sides) - Mansfield Street & Pen Factory - Earl Street (both sides) and Earl Court." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 142 to 153 Southwark Bridge Road (including Stanhope Place), 2 to 15 Chester Terrace, 20 to 45 Great Union Street, the British and Foreign School, 2 to 5 Grosvenor Place, 1 to 21 Earl Street (including the Wesleyan Association building), 1 to 6 Earl Court, 1 to 34 Bond Street, 1 and 2 Mansfield Street (including the Pen Factory) and 1 to 16 Market Street. Students at the British and Foreign School are not included in this index.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 3: described as: "Market St commencing at 'Dog & Stile) (both sides) to Coss (Zinc Worker, opposite Clark's Timber Yard - Providence Place - George St & Passage - Saint George's Row - Parliament Street - St George's Market including Butcher Row - London Road No 92 (Catholic Nunnery) to the 'Duke of Clarence' both inclusive - & Borough Road to Apps inclusive, corner of Mansfield St." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 17 to 42 and 46 to 50 Market Street, 45, 172 and a half and 173 Southwark Bridge Road, 1 and 2 Market Street, 1 to 4 Providence Place, 8 to 23 Butcher Row, 1 to 12 George Street, 1 Falconer's Court, 1 to 5 George(s) Passage, 3 to 17 (St) Georges Row, 2 to 4, 6, 7, 13 and 16 Parliament Street, 1 to 7 and 26 St George's Market, 92 to 132 London Road (including the Catholic convent), and 1 to 8 Borough Road.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 4: described as: "London Road commencing No 91 to 73 inclusive - London Street - John's Court - Morton St & Court - York St (both sides) - York Yard & Court - No 74 London Road to King Alfred Place to Pryer's corner of Southwark Bridge Road, both inclusive." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 6 to 28 Alfred Place, 69 to 91 London Road, 1 to 27 London Street, 1 to 13 Johns Place, 1 to 17 Moreton (sic) Street, 1 to 3 Morton Court, 1 to 35 York Street, 9 John Place (sic) and 10 Johns Court.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 5: described as: "Saint George's Road No 25 to No 51 inclusive - Prospect Cottages by 31 - Ely Place - West Place - West Square - South Street (3 houses) to the end of Parish - East Street & Stables - East Place and Court - North Place - & West Street." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 25 to 51 St Georges Road (including Prospect Cottage), 2 to 12 Ely Place, 6 to 11 West Place, 1 to 49 West Square, 11 and 12 South Street, 1 to 11 East Street, cottage and stables, 1 to 13 East Place and Court, 1 North House, 1 North Cottage, 2 to 7 North Place, 1 and 2 West Street.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 6: described as: "Gibraltar Row (both sides) commencing next to the 'Prince of Wales' - Union Place - Smith's Pl - Caroline Pl - Elliott's Row (west side) to the end of Parish - Mount Row or Place & Elliotts Place." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 65 Gibralter (sic) Row, 1 to 4 Caroline Place, 1 to 4 Castle Place, 1 to 14 Gibralter Place, 4 to 10 Smith's Place, 1 to 6 Union Place, 32 to 63 Elliotts Row, 2 to 16, 33 and 34 Elliotts Place, 2 to 6 Mount Row, and 1 to 3 Elizabeth Place.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 7: described as: "Saint George's Road No 1 to 24 inclusive, including Saint Peter's Hospital - Temple Street (both sides) - Temple Gardens - Pitt Street (both sides) - Pitt Court - Elliotts Row (East side) to end of Parish." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are St Peters Hospital, 1 to 24 St Georges Road, 1 to 39 Temple Street, 19 Temple Gardens, 1 to 51 Pitt Street, 1 to 5 Pitt Court and 1 to 32 Elliotts Row. The index does not include the almsmen and almswomen of St Peters Hospital
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 8: described as: "Saint George's Road, commencing at Beer Shop 'Turnpike Gate', to the Butcher's Shop corner of Marshall Street (both inclusive) - Nelson Place - Princess Street (both sides) Princess Court - Mash Court - Union Court - Lynn Street & Court - Gaywood St & Court." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 24 Gaywood Street, 1 to 6 Gaywood Court, 1 to 12 Lynn Street, 1 to 8 Lynn Court, 1 to 22 Princes Street, 1 to 10 Princes Court, 1 to 15 Mash Court, 1 to 6 Union Court, 1 to 7 Nelson Place, and 68 to 103 St Georges Road.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 9: described as: "Saint George's Road, 'the Fountain' to Wellman's, Garden Row (both inclusive) - Marshall Street (both sides) - Union Street & Courts - and Garden Row (both sides)." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 43 Marshall Street, 1 to 4 Fountain Terrace, 1 to 12 Union Street, 1 to 7 Edmond Court, 8 to 13 Union Court, 14 to 19 Bernau Court, 1 to 21 Alfred Place, 1 to 3 Smith's Court, 56 to 62 St George's Road, 1 to 40 Garden Row, and 1 to 3 Albert Row.
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Incurable lunatics in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for the Royal Hospital of Bethlehem or Bethlem, founded by Edward VI for the cure of poor lunatics. The hospital lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, in St Jude ecclesiastical district. The return of patients was divided into three sections: curable, incurable and criminal lunatics. This index covers the incurable.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 1: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises the West side of the Walworth Road, from West St. to Manor Place, the South side of Manor Place, East side of Canterbury Place, North side of West St., Lorrimore Terrace, Manor Terrace, Cottages in the Fields, Manor St., and South Terrace Lorrimore Road". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 13 Canterbury Place; 1 to 31 Manor Place (including Wooden Cottage and Warner Cottage); 1 to 28 Penton Row (including Manor Cottage, Walworth Road); 1 to 22 West Street; 1 to 15 Harford Place; 1 to 12 Lorrimore Terrace; 1 to 20 Manor Terrace; cottages on Lorrimore Common (including Lorrimore Cottage and Coates's Cottage); 1 to 6 Manor Road; and 1 to 10 South Terrace. HO 107/1567
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 10: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Surrey Grove, Williams Place, King St. (Both sides), Cross St. (both sides), York Road (both sides), Mina Road (both sides), to Parish boundary & Smyrks Road (both sides)". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 23 Surrey Grove; 1 Surrey Grove Cottages; 1 to 11 Cross Street; 1 to 37 King Street (many house numbers reduplicated); 1 to 11 Mina Road (including Alfred Cottage); 1 to 5 Allen Street; 1 to 20 York Road; 4 to 22 Smyrk's Road; 1 Hen and Chicken Lane; 1 to 7 Williams Place; 3 Cross Street; and 1 Era Court, King Street.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 11: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Hen & Chicken Lane (Wesy side) from the Hen & Chickens to Westmoreland Place, North Side of Walworth Common to Providence Street, East side of Providence St. to Ann St., South side of Ann St. Including Langleys Buildings, Princes Lane, Henry Place, Grove St. (both sides), Tucks Buildings & Nurses Court". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 2 and 7 Langley Buildings, 1 to 6 Hen & Chicken Lane; (1 and 2) Princes Street; (1 & 2) Princes Place; 1 to 5 Turners Cottages; 1 and 2 and 8 and 9 Princes Lane; 4 to 9 Princes Court; 1 to 3 Seaborn Cottages; 1 to 7 Monmouth Place; 1 to 18 Henry Place; 1 to 20 Westmor(e)land Row; 1 to 11 Grove Street; 1 to 5 Metcalf Buildings; 1 to 3 Tucks Buildings; 21 to 26 Westmor(e)land Place; 1 to 6 Westmor(e)land Terrace; 1 to 12 Providence Street; 1 to 5 Nurses Court; Providence Cottage(s); 1 to 6 Ann Street; and 10 to 12 Thurlow Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 12: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The South Side of Providence St. from the School to Walworth Common, North side of Walworth Common to Burdett St., East side of Burdett St., East side of Ewhurst St. to Clandon St., Clandon St. from Ewhurst St. to Providence St. (both sides), Including Clandon Court, Clifford St. (both sides), Providence Place, Waterloo St. (both sides) and John St. (both sides) to Burdett St." This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 4 and 7 to 9 Providence Street (including Lime Cottage); 5 and 6 South Street; 1 to 8 Gloucester Place; 1 to 6 Providence Place; 9 Hour Glass Lane; 1 to 16 Clifford Street; 1 to 19 Burdett Street; 1 to 13 and 19 to 22 and 101 Waterloo Street; The Village Maid beershop; 1 to 8 and 14 and 15 (Saint) John Street; 1 to 11 Ewhurst Street; and 1 to 13, 19 to 30 and 68 to 70 Clandon Street.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 13: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The West side of Burdett St., North side of Walworth Common to Portland St., East side of Portland St. to Clandon St., Clandon St. to Ewhurst St. (both sides), Including Guildford St. (both sides), John St. & Waterloo St. from Portland St. to Burdett St. (both sides), and St. Peter St. (both sides)". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 20 to 34 Burdett Street; 1 to 5, 8 to 14 and 19 (Saint) John Street; 1 to 5 St Peters Gardens (including White Cottage); 1 to 3 Lime Cottages; 1 to 11 Waterloo Street; 1 to 6 Frederick Place; 1 to 10 Peter Street; 1 to 10 Saint Peters Place' 2and 5 and 6 Waterloo Place; 1 to 7 Saint James Place; 1 to 12 and 115 to 121 Portland Street; 1 to 7 Adelaide Place, Portland Street; 1 to 5 Bath Place, Portland Street; 1 to 13 and 122 to 129 Guildford Street; and 1 to 15 Clandon Street (including Kings Head beerhouse).
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 14: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The East side of Portland St. from Clandon St. to Trafalgar St, South side of Trafalgar St. from Portland St. to South St., & West side of South St. from Trafalgar St. to Clandon St., Including Burton St. (both sides), Ewhurst St. (both sides) from Clandon St. to the end, Ewhurst Court, Webb St. (both sides), Hope St., Dykes Cottages, Thornton Place, Ebenezer St. (both sides) & Elizabeth Place". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 6 Gloster Place, Portland Street; 1 to 5 and 101 to 108 Portland Street; 1 to 15 and 20 to 24 Burton Street; 1 to 16 Webb Street; 1 to 7 and 51 to 58 Ewhurst Street; 1 to 7 Ewhurst Place; 1 to 7 and 12 Hope Street (including Hope Cottage); 1 to 41 Trafalgar Street (including brewery); 1 and 2 Dykes Cottages; 1 and 2 Thornton Street; 1 to 7 South Street (including Queen Anne beerhouse); 1 to 4 Thornton Place, South Street; and 1 to 16 Ebenezer Street.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 15: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The West side of Portland St. from Liverpool St. to Walworth Common, North side of Walworth Common from Portland St. to Doctor St. (both sides), Smith St. (both sides), Cancel St. (both sides), Merrow St. (both sides) and Grantham Place". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 47 Portland Street, 2 to 37 Merrow Street (including Queen Elizabeth public house), 1 to 3 Grantham Street, 1 to 9 Grantham Place, 1 to 11 and 16 to 18 Smith Street, 1 to 13 and 24 Lower Doctor Street, 1 to 24 Cancel Street, 1 to 20 Upper Doctor Street, and 1 to 3 Portland Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 16: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The North side of Walworth Common from Doctor Street to Queens Row, Queens Row (both sides), Elizabeth St. (both sides), & Phelp St. (both Sides)". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 7 Portland Place, Walworth Common; 1 to 25 Phelp Street (including Rowes Terrace); Phelps Cottages; Portland House, Walworth Common; 1 and 2 Devonshire Cottages, Walworth Common; 1 to 3 Portland Place; 1 to 17 Elizabeth Street, East Side; 1 to 14 Elizabeth Street, West Side; 1 to 14 Anns Terrace, Elizabeth Street; 1 to 4 Devonshire Place; Laurel Cottage; and 1 to 62 Queens Row (including Bricklayers Arms beerhouse and Pilgrim public house).
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 17: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The North side of Walworth Common from Queens Row to Walworth Road, East side of Walworth Road to Trafalgar St., Including Church Terrace, Peacock Terrace to Peacock St., Kings Row (both sides), Mount St. (both sides), Horsley St. and Little Mount St." This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 3 Walworth Common Road; 1 to 23 Horsley Street; 1 to 5 Port Place; 1 to 5 Red Lion Street; Red Lion public house; 1 to 20 Mount Street (including School House); 1 to 10 Little Mount Street; 27 to 40 Beckford Row; 1 to 8 Church Terrace; 1 to 16 Peacock Terrace; 1 and 2 Sutherland Mews; and 1 to 28 Kings Row.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 9: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Liverpool St. from Peacock St. (both sides) West side of Portland St. to Trafalgar St., Trafalgar St. from Portland St. to Walworth Road (both sides)". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 6 Liverpool Terrace; 1 to 6 St Peters Terrace; Dowsett Cottage, Liverpool Street; 1 to 19 and 39 Liverpool Street; 48 to 60 Portland Street; and 1 to 45, 88, 89 and 99 Trafalgar Street (including Trafalgar House).
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 19: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The East side of Walworth Road from Trafalgar St. to East St. South side of East St., to Richmond St., and West side of Richmond St. to George St., Including Bronti Place, Walworth Gardens, Walworth Place, & Beckford Place". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 26 Beckford Row; 1 to 44 East Street (including Good Intent beerhouse and Joiners Arms beerhouse); 1 to 4 Gloucester Place (including Royal George beerhouse); 22 to 30 Richmond Street, East Street; 1 to 41 Bronti Place; 1 to 14 Walworth Gardens, East Street; 1 to 8 Walworth Place; and 1 to 6 Beckford Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 2: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Both sides of the Lorrimore Road, Bridge Cottages, Bridge Place, West St. (south side), Including Cottage Grove, West side of Walworth Road from West St to Carter St., Carter St. (both sides) including Walworth House". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 8 Octavius Terrace; 1 to 7 Sutherland Terrace; 2 and 4 St Georges Terrace; 1 and 7 to 11 Onslow Terrace; 2 to 8 Margaret Terrace; cottages on Lorrimore Road (including Ivey Cottage and Flora Cottage); 1 to 11 Anns Terrace; 1 to 5 Bridge Cottages; 1 to 3 Bridge Place; Field Cottage, Edina Cottage, Sylvan Cottage and Grove Cottage in West Street; 1 to 9 Cottage Grove; Harford Cottage, West Street; 2 to 10 Cottage Place; Elizabeth Cottage, West Street; 1 to 11 West Street; 1 to 17 Keens Row; 1 to 43 Carter Street; and Walworth House. HO 107/1567
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 20: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises George St. (both sides), Richmond St. (East side), East St. (south side) to Pleasant Place, Including Pleasant Place, Belgrade Place (both sides) & Nottingham Walk". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 40 and 60 to 62 George Street (including Pear Tree Cottage and Trafalgar Cottage); 1 to 22 Richmond Street (including Richmond Cottage); 3 Little George Street; 1 to 10 East Street; 1 to 4 Pleasant Row (including White Cottage); 1 to 16 Belgrave (Belgrade) Place; Brights Cottage; 1 to 3 East Lane; Southampton Cottage; 2 to 3 Sandford Row; and 1 Sandford Cottages.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 21: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises East St. (south side) from Pleasant Place to Hen & Chicken Lane, Trafalgar St. from Belgrade Place to South St, (north side) Including Sandford Row, Phoenix Place, Pleasant Row, and Nottingham Place." This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 8 and 11 to 15 Norfolk Place, East Street; 1 to 12 Wellington Place, East Street; 1 to 10 South Street, East Street; 1 to 19 Pleasant Row; 1 to 10 Nottingham Place; Phoenix Cottage; 1 and 2 Phoenix Place; 1 to 9 Sandford Row; 1 to 31 and 46 to 52 Trafalgar Street; Apollo Cottage; 1 to 25 Apollo Buildings; and 13 to 28 Prior Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 21: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises South St. (East side), Ann St. (North side), Anns Row, Thurlow Place to Ann St., Aylesbury St. (both sides), Hen & Chicken Lane from the Hen & Chickens to East St. (both sides) Including James Place, and Victory Place, South side of East St. from Hen & Chicken Lane to Parish boundary, Surrey Square, Including Claremont Place and Crawleys Cottages." This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 12 Anns Terrace; 2 to 7 Anns Row; 1 to 10 Anns Buildings; 1 to 9 Thurlow Place (including leather yard); 1 to 10 Ann(s) Street; 1 to 6 Aylesbury Place; Swiss Cottage; 1 to 4 Victory Place; 1 to 4 Pleasant Place; 1 to 8 Elizabeth Place; Brockley Lodge; 1 to 7 Victoria Place; 1 to 8 James Place; 1 to 3 Commerce Place; 1 to 9 Charles Place, East Street; 1 to 27 Anns Place; 1 to 8 Claremont Place; 1 and 2 Claremont Cottages; 27 and 28 Crawley Cottages; 1 to 29 Surrey Square; and Grove House, Surrey Square.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 22: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises East St. (North side) to John St., John St. (both sides) Including Tatums Place, Tatums Court, Ballards Yard, Woods Buildings, & Aldred Place to boundary". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are East Street (six households); 1 to 4 Smiths Buildings, East Street; 1 to 12 Bedford Row; 1 to 17 Woods Buildings (including tan yard); 1 to 18 Alfred Place; 1 to 6 Sion Place; 1 to 21 and 36 to 44 John Street (including yards); 1 to 3 Tatum's Court; 3 to 6 Woods Buildings; 1 to 3 Ballards Yard; Park Place; 2 to 13 Tatum's Place; and 1 to 14 Ludbroke Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 23: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises East St. (North side) from John St. to Flint St, Flint St. (East side) & West side to Deans Buildings, Including Park Place (both sides), Huntsman St., Little Park Place, Park Road, & Hearnes Buildings". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 7 to 13 Sion Place; 1 to 20 Park Place (including Park Cottage (two)); 1 and 2 Huntsman Street; 1 to 7 Little Park Place; Park House Police Station; 1 to 4 Park Road; 1 to 16 Prior Place; 1 to 5 Brunswick Terrace; 1 to 8 and 31 to 41 Flint Street; and 1 and 2 Hearnes Buildings.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 25: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Deans Buildings (both sides), Flint St. (West side) from Deans Buildings to East St., North side of East St. to Sun St., Sun St. (both Sides), Little Sun St., Blendon Row, and Orchard Place." This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 16 Deans Buildings; 1 to 7 Deans Court; 9 to 24 Flint Street (including Flint Street School); 1 to 16 Apollo Buildings; 15, 17, 24 and 25 East Street; 20 to 23 Richmond Place; 1 to 12, 30 to 32 and 75 and 76 Sun Street; 1 to 9 Little Sun Street; 1 to 12 Blindon (Blendon) Row; and Orchard Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 26: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The North side of East St. from Sun St. to Camden Street, Camden St. (both sides), Princes St. (both sides), Including New St., Union St., and Albert Place". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 33 Camden Street (including Lord Camden public house); 1 to 10 Princes Street; 1 to 33 New Street; 1 to 3 Union Cottages, Union Street; Albion Cottages; 1 to 7, 24 and 25 Union Street; 3 to 12 Albert Place; 5 and 7 Rose & Crown; Richmond Place; East Street (1 house); Richmond Cottages; and 1 to 28 Richmond Terrace (including Masons Arms public house).
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 27: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises East St. (North side) from Camden St. to Kings Arch Place, Including King St., Queen St., Locks Place, Victoria Place, Brewhouse Place, Cross St., and Lestock Place". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 17 to 19 and 24 to 29 East Street; 1 Pleasant Place; 2 to 13 Pleasant Row; 1 to 31 King Street; 1 to 10 Cross Street; 1 to 19 Queen(s) Street; 2 to 15 Locks Place; 1 to 11 Victory Place; 1 to 4 Brewhouse Place; 1 to 12 Upper Cross Street; and 1 to 7 Lestock Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 28: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Kings Arch Place, North side of East St. to Walworth Road, East side of Walworth Road to York St., South side of York St. to Camden St., Including James St., Cottage Place, Manchester Buildings and North Buildings". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 19 King's Arch Place; 1 to 16 East Street; 1 to 12 North Buildings; 2 to 16 Manchester Buildings; 1 and 2 Cottage Place; 1 to 37 Crosby Row; 1 to 5 and 26 York Street; 1 to 46 James Street; and 4 Acton Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 29: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The South side of Bedford St. from Camden St. to Nelsons Place, West side of Nelsons Place to Eltham St., Eltham St. (both sides), Missionary Place, Townly Place and Nursery Row". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 5 Little Seymour Place; 1 to 10 Missionary Place (including travelling showmen dwelling in show carriages in a yard, and Camden Cottage); 1 to 10 Townley Place; 1 to 3 Eltham Cottages, Eltham Street; 1 to 28 Eltham Street; 1 to 22 Nursery Row; 1 to 7 Nelson Place; 1 to 15 Bedford Street; 1 to 4 Bedford Court; 1 and 2 Banks Court; Banks Yard; and 1 and 2 Friendly Place, Bedford Street.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 3: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises the West side of Walworth Road, from Walworth House to Walworth Gate, including The Toll House, Sutherland St. (both sides), the whole of Sutherland Square, and Terrace, Charlotte St., Charlotte Row, Princes Row, Graham St., Blucher St., Montpelier St. (East side), North side of Hill St. to Kettle's Place. Including Kettle's Place". HO 107/1567. This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 6 Keens Row; 1 to 32 Sutherland Street; 1, 2 and 6 to 12 Sutherland Terrace; 1 to 17 Sutherland Square; 1 to 11 Walworth Place; 1 to 7 Charlotte Street; 1 and 2 Sutherland Cottages; 1 Sutherland Mews; 1 to 24 Charlotte Row; 1 to 13 Princes Row; Montpelier Tavern; Craigs Cottage; 1 to 13 Graham Street; 1 to 7 Blucher Street; 1 to 4 Montpelier Street; 1 to 14 Hill Street; 1 to 19 James Place; and 1 to 6 Kettles Place.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 30: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Nelson Place (East side), Salisbury Place (South side) from Nelson Place to Northampton Place, Northampton Place (both sides), North St. (both sides) and Nelsons Court". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 25 Nelsons Place; 10 to 34 Salisbury Place; 1 to 30 and 99 to 102 North Street (including Fleets Yard); 1 to 10 Northampton Place; 1 to 4 Northampton Buildings; 1 to 11 Nelsons Court; and Hawkesbury Cottage.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 4: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises the North side of Hill St. from Kettles Place to the end, and the south side of Hill St. to George St. including John St. (both sides), William St. (both sides), Royal St. (both sides), and George St. both sides". HO 107/1567. This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 2 to 7 and 15 to 81 Hill Street; 2 to 4 and 81 John Street; 1 and 2 Johns Place; 1 to 9 Garden Row; 2 to 12 William Street; 1 to 13 Park Place; 1 to 13, 21 to 28 and 32 to 47 Royal Street, and house in field; Royal Standard beerhouse; 1 Caledonian Cottages; 1 and 2 Victoria Cottages; 2 to 24 Victoria Place; Prince George public house; and 1 to 4 George Street.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 5: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises the South side of Hill St. from George St. to Montpelier St., West Side of Montpelier St., and North side of Beresford St." HO 107/1567. This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 3, 11 to 15, 53, 69 to 74, 81 to 94, 99 to 101, 104 and 105, and 123 to 126 Hill Street; 1 and 2 Mary Ann Cottages; Hope Cottage; 1 and 2 Laurel Cottage; 2 to 5 and 9 Ebenezer Place; 1 to 8 Spring Cottages; 1 to 4 Alliance Cottage, Montpelier Street; 1 to 97 Beresford Street (including Prince Royal public house); 1 to 7 Kennington Street; and 1 to 5 St Georges Terrace, Beresford Street.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 6: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises the south side of Beresford St., West side of Walworth Road to Grosvenor St. Including Brunswick Terrace, North Side of Grosvenor St., and North Terrace". HO 107/1567. This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 3 Canterbury Terrace; 1 to 3 Oliver Cottages; 1 to 29 Flood's Terrace; Queen's Cottages; 1 and 2 Beresford Cottage; Lion Cottage;1 and 2 Rose Cottage(s); 1 to 34 Beresford Terrace; 1 to 28 Kennington Street; 1 to 8 Beresford Street; Brown's Cottage; 1 to 4 Williams Place; Barwick's Stables; 1 to 6 Williams Place (South); 1 to 16 Brunswick Terrace; 1 to 3 Brunswick Place; Brunswick Cottage; Grosvenor Cottage; 1 to 5 Grosvenor Place; 1 to 19 Grosvenor Street; and 1 to 6 North Terrace.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 7: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Grosvenor Park (North & South) Includings Huts on Common, South Terrace, South side of Grosvenor St., and West side of Walworth Road to Parish boundary. Boundary Lane & Bolingbroke Row on the East side of Walworth Road to the Turnpike". HO 107/1567. This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 44 Grosvenor Park North; Oliver Cottage; 1 to 4 Grosvenor Park Terrace; Red Garden Cottage, Lorrimore Common; 1 and 2 Lorrimore Common; Temperance Cottage, Windmill Lane; 5 to 38 Grosvenor Park South; 1 to 13 South Terrace, Grosvenor Park; Gardeners Cottage; 4 to 12 (including Lupton Cottage, 5) and 21 to 23 Grosvenor Street South; 1 to 4 White Cottage, Grosvenor Street; 6 to 18 Grosvenor Place, Walworth Road; 1 to 3 Bolingbroke Cottage, Boundary Row; Pilgrim Cottage, 21 Boundary Row; 1 to 3 Pilgrim Place, Boundary Row; 4 Vine Cottage; Omnibus(s) Yard; 5, Milk House, Boundary Row; 1 to 4 Elizabeth Place, Boundary Row; 1 to 26 Bolingbroke Row, Walworth; and Gurneys Stables.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 8: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Walworth Common (south side) from Walworth Road to Providence St., Including West side of Providence St., Appleton Place, Charles St., Pilgrim St. (both sides), Port St. (both sides), Milk St. (both sides) and Red Lion Row". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 7 Red Lion Row, Grosvenor Park; 1 to 7 Port Place, Walworth Common; 1 to 27 Milk Street; 1 to 6 Port Place; 2 to 24 Port Street; Port House, Port Street; 1 to 32 Pilgrim Streeet; 1 to 3 Bucknell Place; 1 to 7 Charles Street; 1 to 4 Nuns Place; 1 to 5 Appleton Place; 1 to 6 Boytons Place; 1 to 6 Portland Terrace; and 9 to 18 Providence Street.
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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 9: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises The East side of Providence St., South side of Walworth Common to Wellington Place. Including Johns Place (both sides), Upton Place, St. Pauls Place, Villa St. both sides to Parish boundary, Walworth Villa, and Lebanon Place". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 2 to 8 and 18 to 20 Providence Street; 1 to 5 Providence Place; 7 to 11 Portland Terrace; 1 to 10 John Place; 1 to 3 Upton Place; 2 to 4 Upton Cottages; 1 to 5 St Pauls Cottages, 1 to 12 St Pauls Place; 1 to 9 Villa Place; 1 to 3 Villa Street; 1 to 10 and 18 Villa Row; Villa House; Hour Glass public house; 1 to 6 Trafalgar Row; 1 to 7 Villa (including Infant School for the Pauper Children); 1 to 5 Lebanon Place; various numbers Westmoreland Place; and Wellington Cottage.
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Men in Newington Workhouse in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for Newington Workhouse, which served the whole of St Mary Newington, Surrey, poor law union: in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. This is the index to the adult males in the institution.
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Boys in Newington Workhouse in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for Newington Workhouse, which served the whole of St Mary Newington, Surrey, poor law union: in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. This is the index to the boys in the institution.
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Girls in Newington Workhouse in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for Newington Workhouse, which served the whole of St Mary Newington, Surrey, poor law union: in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. This is the index to the girls in the institution.
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Women in Newington Workhouse in Surrey (1851-1851)

The 1851 census return for Newington Workhouse, which served the whole of St Mary Newington, Surrey, poor law union: in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. This is the index to the adult females in the institution.
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Traders and professionals in London (1851-1851)

The Post Office London Directory for 1851 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording about 80,000 individuals.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1851-1851)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, where a boarder, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Crewkerne School (1851-1851)

Crewkerne Grammar School in Somerset was founded in 1499; as part of the quatercentenary celebrations a History of Crewkerne School, by the Reverend R. Grosvenor Bartelot, was published in 1899; and this included this school register from 1828 to 1899. Until 1877 only foundationers (day boys part of whose fees was paid out of the school foundation) are listed; thereafter boarders as well as day scholars. Names are arranged by date of entrance; surname is given first, then christian name, age at entry, date of entering, and date of leaving.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1851-1851)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1851-1851)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1851-1851)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. July to December 1851
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Boys entering Rugby School (1851-1851)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1851-1851)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Assignments of bankrupts' estates in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignments of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date (in brackets), address and trade; followed by the names and addresses of the trustees to whom the estate was delivered, and the name and address of the solicitor. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Assignees of bankrupts' estates in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignees of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), and trade; followed by the names, addresses and trades of the assignees to whom the estate was delivered. This is the index to the names of the assignees, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Bankrupts in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.
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Bankrupt meeting strays (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. In descriptions of meetings as the case progressed the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to stray names in the bankruptcy meetings, of co-bankrupts, solicitors, &c., from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Dividends of insolvents' estates in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included brief notices of dividends of insolvents' estates. Each entry gives the year that the insolvency was first gazetted, the surname and initials of the bankrupt, trade and address; followed by the amount of the dividend as shillings and pence in the pound. This is the index to the names of the insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Insolvents imprisoned for debt in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included brief notices of insolvents' estates surrendered to assignees. Each entry gives the surname and christian name of the insolvent, trade and address, followed by the name of the prison. This is the index to the names of the insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Insolvents in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of insolvencies and stages in the process whereby the insolvents petitioned for release from debtors' prison. The insolvent is generally referred to by name (surname first), address and trade. This is the index to the names of the insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Assignments of bankrupts' estates in Ireland (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignments of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date (in brackets), address and trade; followed by the names and addresses of the trustees to whom the estate was delivered, and the name and address of the solicitor. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Irish Bankrupts (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of Irish bankrupts to surrender at the Court of Bankruptcy on Lower Ormond Quay. The initial entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), address and trade, often with the phrase dlr. and ch., for 'dealer and chapman'; the dates of the stages of the official surrender, the name and address of the agent and the date of the fiat. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Bankrupts in England and Wales petitioning for discharge (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. Towards the end of the process there was a Meeting for Allowance of Certificates, where the bankrupt applied for a certificate of discharge. This meeting sometimes took place many years after the bankruptcy procedure started: the details given are the year originally gazetted, name (surname first), address, and trade; and the date and time of the hearing. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of dissolutions of partnerships gazetted in England and Wales. The names of the partners are given in full, surnames in capitals, followed by trade and address, and date of the end of the partnership. Each entry usually ends with the phrase 'Debts by ...', indicating which partner intended to continue, and resume the responsibilities of, the business. This is the index to the names of the partners, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Scottish Bankrupts (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of sequestrations of Scottish bankrupts' estates. The initial entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), trade and address; the dates and place of the stages of the sequestration process, and the date by which claims against the estate were to be lodged. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Scottish Partnerships Dissolved &c. (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of sequestrations of Scottish bankrupts' estates, and partnerships dissolved. This is the index to the names of the partners, together with various stray names from the bankruptcy notices, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Trustees and solicitors in England and Wales (1851-1851)

Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of assignments of bankrupts' estates. Each entry gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date (in brackets), address and trade; followed by the names and addresses of the trustees to whom the estate was delivered, and the name and address of the solicitor. This is the index to the names of the trustees and solicitors, from the issues from January to December 1851.
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Staff of the House of Correction at Westminster (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The House of Correction of the City of Westminster was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Stephen's; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were 21 officers, 8 members of their families, and 6 servants; the institution held 737 prisoners - 245 men and 492 women. HO 107/1480
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Prisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The House of Correction of the City of Westminster was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Stephen's; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were 21 officers, 8 members of their families, and 6 servants; the institution held 737 prisoners - 245 men and 492 women. HO 107/1480
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Children of prisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The House of Correction of the City of Westminster was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Stephen's; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were 21 officers, 8 members of their families, and 6 servants; the institution held 737 prisoners - 245 men and 492 women. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Broadway, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Carteret Mews, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Carteret Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Dartmouth Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Devonshire Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of King's Head Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Little Park Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of New Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Park Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Queens Square Mews, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Queens Square Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Queens Square, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Tothill Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 10 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Bell Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of James Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of King's Head Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Ship Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Ship Gardens, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of York Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of York Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of York Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of York Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 11 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Blue Anchor Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Broadway, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Gardners Lane, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Hope Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Maidenhead Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Bonners Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Rowcliffs Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Snows Rents, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of St Ermin's Hill, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of York Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 12 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Almswomen of Red Lion Almshouses, York Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Chapel Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Church Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Coach and Horses Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Horseshoe Alley, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Little Chapel Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Little George Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Little James Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of New Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Pump Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Smiths Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Smiths Rents, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Woods Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of York Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 13 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Catherine Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 14 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Catherine Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 14 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of James Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 14 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Princes Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 14 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Stafford Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 14 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Stafford Place South, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 14 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Buckingham Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 15 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of James Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 15 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Palace Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 15 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of William Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 15 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Almsmen of Emanuel Hospital Almshouses, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Almswomen of Emanuel Hospital Almshouses, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Caroline Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Castle Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Castle Lane, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Castle Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Crane Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Dulles Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Staff of Emanuel Hospital, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Scholars of Emanuel Hospital, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Henrys Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Hopkins Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Isabella Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Manns Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Pineapple Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Union Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 16 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Artillery Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Boyle Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Brewers Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Frederick Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Fulmers Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Fulmers Square, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Goodmans Green, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Paradise Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Perrins Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Providence Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Providence Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of St Francis Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Symons Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 17 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Brewers Green, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Brewers Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Buckingham Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Loaders Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Little James Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Queens Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Wyeth Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of York Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 18 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Mark's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Adam's Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Carpenter's Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Francis Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Francis Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of the Green Coat Boy public house, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Green Coat Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Green Coat Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Parkin's Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Robertson's Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of St Margaret's Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of St Margaret's Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Scholars at St Margaret's Hospital, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Staff of St Margaret's Hospital, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Windsor Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Windsor Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 19 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Abingdon Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Great College Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of the Houses of Parliament, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Old Palace Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Poets Corner, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of St Margaret Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Boys at St Peter's College, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Staff at St Peter's College, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the part that lay in St Margaret's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of the Cloisters, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the (extra-parochial) part that lay in St Peter's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Deans Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the (extra-parochial) part that lay in St Peter's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Deans Yard Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the (extra-parochial) part that lay in St Peter's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Little Cloisters, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret registrar's district, enumeration district 1 was in two parts: this is from the (extra-parochial) part that lay in St Peter's ecclesiastical district. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Adam's Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Francis Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kine Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Phillips Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Pond Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Poole Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Wellington Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Willow Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Willow Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 20 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Anns Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 21 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Buckingham Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 21 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Cobourg Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 21 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Elizabeth Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 21 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Williams Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 21 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Willow Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 21 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Bevoir Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 22 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Gloster Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 22 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Mann's Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 22 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of St Andrew's Cottages, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 22 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of St Andrew's Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 22 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Warwick Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 22 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Stephen's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Albert Gate, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Albert Terrace, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Charles Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of High Row, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Lowndes Terrace, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Mills Buildings, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Park Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Park Row, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Williams Cottages, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of William Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 23 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Eden Lodge, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Ennismore Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Gore House, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Gore Lane, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Police families at Gore Lane Police Section House, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Grove House, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Hyde Park Terrace, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kensington Gore, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kent House, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kingston House, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Park House, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Princes Gate, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Prince's Terrace, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Stratheden House, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 24 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of High Road, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of King's Row, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Knightsbridge Green (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Knights Green, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Middle Row, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Phoenix Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Raphael Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Rose and Crown Yard, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of South Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Trevor Terrace, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 25 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Arthur Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Caroline Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Cottage Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Fulham Bridge Yard, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Launceston Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Petwin Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Trevor Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Trevor Square, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Tullett Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 26 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Charles Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 27 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Hill Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 27 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Montpelier Square, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 27 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Pupils of Montpelier Square School, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 27 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Montpelier Terrace, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 27 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Trevor Square, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 27 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Alfred Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 28 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Ennismore Mews, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 28 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Montpelier Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 28 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Montpelier Row, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 28 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Montpelier Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 28 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Parkers Cottages, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 28 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Brown's Buildings, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Cumberland Yard, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of High Road, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of High Street, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kensington Palace (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kensington Palace Gardens, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kensington Palace Green, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Kensington Place, Knightsbridge (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 29 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
>> Search this source

Residents of Bridge Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Bridge Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Cannon Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Derby Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Manchester Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Pupils of the National Society School, Manchester Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Staff of the National Society School, Manchester Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of New Palace Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Parliament Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Richmond Terrace, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 2 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Crown Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Downing Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Fludyer Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Great George Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Horse Guards, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Lower Crown Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Parliament Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Say's Place, Crown Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of South Parade, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Upper Charles Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Upper Crown Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Whitehall, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Whitehall Gardens, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Whitehall Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 3 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Bakers Alley, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 4 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Boars Head Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 4 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Charles Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 4 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Gardener's Lane, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 4 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of King Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 4 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of the Police Station, King Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 4 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Rams Mews, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 4 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Delahay Mews, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Delahay Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Duke Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Great George Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Little George Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Park Prospect, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Prince's Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Prince's Mews, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Prince's Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 5 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Dartmouth Row, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Dartmouth Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Great Queen Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Lewisham Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Little Queen Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Parker Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Police constables lodging over stables at Park Prospect, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
>> Search this source

Residents of Prince's Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Prince's Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Stables, Park Prospect, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 6 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Cooper Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Dacre Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Dean Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Duck Lane, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of New Pye Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of New Tothill Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of New Way, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Old Pye Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Orchard Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Pear Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Strutton Ground, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Black Horse Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Cock Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Dartmouth Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Fleece Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Patients at Westminster Hospital (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Staff at Westminster Hospital (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Jeffreys Buildings, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of New Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Swan Yard, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Tothill Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Residents of Tothill Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480
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Almswomen in Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480. This includes the almswomen at Palmers, Wickers, Butlers and Kifford's almshouses.
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Residents of Brewers Green, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Broadway, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Castle Court, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Chapel Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Eliza Place, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Great Chapel Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Little Chapel Street, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of St Ermins Hill, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Residents of Strutton Ground, Westminster (1851-1851)

In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 9 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and Christ Church ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.
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Soldiers in Hyde Park Cavalry Barrack (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" Hyde Park Cavalry Barrack was in the city of Westminster; in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of All Saints Knightsbridge; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. HO 107/1480
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Soldiers in Kensington Cavalry Barrack (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" Kensington Cavalry Barrack was in the city of Westminster; in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of All Saints Knightsbridge; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. HO 107/1480
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Soldiers in Kensington Infantry Barrack (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" Kensington Infantry Barrack was in the city of Westminster; in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of All Saints Knightsbridge; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. HO 107/1480
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Royal Sappers and Miners in Kensington Palace Barrack (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" Kensington Palace Barrack was in the city of Westminster; in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of All Saints Knightsbridge; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. HO 107/1480
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Staff of Westminster Workhouse (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The Workhouse of Westminster St Margaret and St John the Evangelist was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Margaret; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were just three officers, and two members of their families; the institution held 594 inmates - 239 men and 355 women, but many of these served as staff for the general running of the workhouse. HO 107/1480
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Westminster Workhouse Inmates (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The Workhouse of Westminster St Margaret and St John the Evangelist was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Margaret; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were just three officers, and two members of their families; the institution held 594 inmates - 239 men and 355 women, but many of these served as staff for the general running of the workhouse. HO 107/1480
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Soldiers and staff in Wellington Barracks, Westminster (1851-1851)

The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" Wellington Barracks was in the city of Westminster; in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of Christ Church; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were four officers, two family members, 15 servants, and 609 soldiers and wives. HO 107/1480
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1851-1851)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Cheltenham College (1851-1851)

Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).
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Boys entering Elizabeth College, Guernsey (1851-1851)

Elizabeth College, Guernsey, was founded in 1563 and rechartered in 1825. Charles James Durand, Kentish Brock and Edward Charles Ozanne compiled this edition of the college register, published in 1898. The names are arranged by term of entering the school, with a sequential number, surname and christian names in bold: then place and date of birth, father's name or reference to a brother previously at the school; and year of leaving. Beneath that, in smaller type, the compilers put what they could glean about the boy's subsequent career.
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Boys entering Leeds Grammar School (1851-1851)

The admission books for Leeds Grammar School from 1820 to 1900 were edited by Edmund Wilson and published in 1906. The series of registers is almost complete for the period, there being in addition admission registers for the Lower (or Commercial) Department from 1856 to 1865, and lists of boys in the school in 1856, and in the Commercial Department in 1861. The entries are arranged by date or term of admission: a sequential number is given first, then surname, christian name, and, after a dash, father's christian name, occupation, and address; another dash, and then the age of the boy at admission, and often his year of leaving (with the abbreviation r. for 'removed' or 'left'). r.* means left without notice; (o) or S. or Stranger or Foreigner indicates a boy not on the foundation. The editor was unable to divine the meaning of the abbreviation (Q) or the asterisks prefixed to most entries in 1856 to 1860, but dutifully copies them into the text. In smaller type he then proceeds, where possible, to add some information about the boy's subsequent career.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1851-1851)

This First Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; and a synopsis of his career, so far as known.
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Boys entering Sedbergh School (1851-1851)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Boys entering Uppingham School (1851-1851)

The public school at Uppingham in Rutland was founded by Archdeacon Johnson in 1584. A roll of scholars from 1824 to 1905 was edited by J. P. Graham, and published in 1906. This was a revision and updating of an 1894 edition of the roll, the great bulk of the work having been done by Mrs Mullins. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy's name is given, surname first, with an asterisk where known (in 1906) to have died. Then there is month and year of birth, father's name (most often just surname and initials) and address (at entrance). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), that is indicated. After the month and year of leaving the school, there is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, address as in 1906.
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Pupil Teachers in Anglesey: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Bedfordshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Berkshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Brecknockshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Buckinghamshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Caermarthenshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Caernarvonshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cambridgeshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cardiganshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cheshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cornwall: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cumberland: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Denbighshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Derbyshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Devonshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Dorsetshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in County Durham: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Essex: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Flintshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Glamorganshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Gloucestershire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Hampshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Herefordshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Hertfordshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Huntingdonshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in the Isle of Man: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Kent: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Lancashire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Leicestershire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Lincolnshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Merionethshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Middlesex: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Monmouthshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Montgomeryshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Norfolk: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Northamptonshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Northumberland: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Nottinghamshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Oxfordshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Pembrokeshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Aberdeenshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Argyleshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Ayrshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Banffshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Berwickshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Caithnessshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Clackmannanshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Dumbartonshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Dumfriesshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Edinburghshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Elginshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Fifeshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Forfarshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Haddingtonshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Invernessshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Kincardineshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Kinrossshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Kirkcudbrightshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Lanarkshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Linlithgowshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Perthshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Renfrewshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Rossshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Roxburghshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Stirlingshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Sutherlandshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Wigtownshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Shropshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Somersetshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Staffordshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Suffolk: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Surrey: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Sussex: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Warwickshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Westmorland: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Wiltshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Worcestershire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Yorkshire: Boys (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Anglesey: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Bedfordshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Berkshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Buckinghamshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Caermarthenshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Caernarvonshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cambridgeshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cheshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cornwall: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Cumberland: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Denbighshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Derbyshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Devonshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Dorsetshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in County Durham: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Essex: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Flintshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Glamorganshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Gloucestershire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Hampshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Herefordshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Hertfordshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Huntingdonshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in the Isle of Man: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Kent: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Lancashire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Leicestershire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Lincolnshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Middlesex: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Monmouthshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Montgomeryshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Norfolk: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Northamptonshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Northumberland: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Nottinghamshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Oxfordshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Pembrokeshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Radnorshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Aberdeenshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Ayrshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Edinburghshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Forfarshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Lanarkshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Perthshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Renfrewshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Shropshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Somersetshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Staffordshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Suffolk: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Surrey: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Sussex: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Warwickshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Westmorland: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Wiltshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Worcestershire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Pupil Teachers in Yorkshire: Girls (1851-1851)

The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).
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Boys entering Tonbridge School (1851-1851)

W. O. Hughes-Hughes, late Assistant-Master of Tonbridge School, prepared this edition of the school register. The Kent grammar school was founded by royal charter in 1553, but the surviving register commences with the names of 69 boys called over on Skinners' Day 1826. After that they are arranged alphabetically by quarter to 1833, and thereafter by term of entry. Each entry gives, where known: the boy's surname (in capitals) and full christian name(s); the years when at the school; father's name; year of birth; school honours; and a resume of his subsequent career.
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Printer elected to a pension (1851-1851)

The Printers' Pension Society was formed 3 December 1827 for 'the relief of aged, infirm, and distressed workmen, and their widows, in the several branches of the printing trade'. This list of pensioners elected through to December 1881 sets out in tabular form sequential number; year of election; full name (surname first); occupation (such as compositor, pressman, warehouseman, &c.); age at election; total amount paid (to December 1881 where still then living); and year of decease. The names of pensioners still alive at the end of 1881 are given in italics. The final column gives the number of husband or of widow in those cases where the spouse appears elsewhere in the list.
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Printer's widow elected to a pension (1851-1851)

The Printers' Pension Society was formed 3 December 1827 for 'the relief of aged, infirm, and distressed workmen, and their widows, in the several branches of the printing trade'. This list of pensioners elected through to December 1881 sets out in tabular form sequential number; year of election; full name (surname first); occupation (such as compositor, pressman, warehouseman, &c.); age at election; total amount paid (to December 1881 where still then living); and year of decease. The names of pensioners still alive at the end of 1881 are given in italics. The final column gives the number of husband or of widow in those cases where the spouse appears elsewhere in the list.
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Subscribers to 'Poems for Home' (1851-1851)

'Poems for Home', by Isabella Caulton (authoress of the 'Domestic Hearth,' and other poems) was published at Leamington Spa in 1851.
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New South Wales Intestates (1851-1851)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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New Zealand Intestates (1851-1851)

The probate courts of the Australasian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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New South Wales District of Port Phillip (Victoria) Intestates (1851-1851)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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South Australia Intestates (1851-1851)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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Victoria Intestates (1851-1851)

The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted.
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Students entering the Albert National Agricultural Training Institution, Dublin (1851-1851)

This register of internal students gives full name; date of entry; date of leaving; time spent at the institution (in years and months); and, particularly interesting, 'destination of leaving' - such as 'Teacher in Tullamore Workhouse School', 'Emigrated to America', 'Agriculturist at Dunmanway'.
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Victims of Outrages: Kilmacrenan barony, county Donegal (1851-1851)

Return of outrages specially reported by the constabulary as committed within the barony of Kilmacrenan, county Donegal: giving date of the offence; parish and townland; name and class of the injured person; nature of the offence; number of persons arrested; and whether conviction was had or not.
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Classics students at Cambridge University (1852-1852)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within First and Second Class in order of score in the examination (students getting exactly equal marks are bracketed together with the note 'AEq.'). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. In each year two students were singled out for the Chancellor's Medals, and these are marked, (A) for senior, (B) for junior (or with a paragraph mark if adjudged of equal merit). These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Civil law students at Cambridge University (1852-1852)

Examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of students with equal marks being bracketed together). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became judges, &c. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1852-1852)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together, with the word 'AEq.'). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. The Greek letter alpha is affixed to the names of those students who had gained first class results in the Classical Tripos; beta to those entered in the second class; and gamma to those entered in the third class. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Moral Sciences students at Cambridge University (1852-1852)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First and Second), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together). First examination students are listed as Commencing Bachelors; final examination students as Middle Bachelors. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Natural Sciences students at Cambridge University (1852-1852)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First and Second), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Irish Bankrupts (1852-1852)

Bankruptcy notices for Ireland: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links
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Dissolutions of Partnerships (1852-1852)

Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales
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Scottish Bankrupts (1852-1852)

Scotch Sequestrations: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1852-1852)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, where a boarder, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Crewkerne School (1852-1852)

Crewkerne Grammar School in Somerset was founded in 1499; as part of the quatercentenary celebrations a History of Crewkerne School, by the Reverend R. Grosvenor Bartelot, was published in 1899; and this included this school register from 1828 to 1899. Until 1877 only foundationers (day boys part of whose fees was paid out of the school foundation) are listed; thereafter boarders as well as day scholars. Names are arranged by date of entrance; surname is given first, then christian name, age at entry, date of entering, and date of leaving.
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1852-1852)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. January to June 1852
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1852-1852)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1852-1852)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Rugby School (1852-1852)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1852-1852)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1852-1852)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Cheltenham College (1852-1852)

Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).
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Boys entering Elizabeth College, Guernsey (1852-1852)

Elizabeth College, Guernsey, was founded in 1563 and rechartered in 1825. Charles James Durand, Kentish Brock and Edward Charles Ozanne compiled this edition of the college register, published in 1898. The names are arranged by term of entering the school, with a sequential number, surname and christian names in bold: then place and date of birth, father's name or reference to a brother previously at the school; and year of leaving. Beneath that, in smaller type, the compilers put what they could glean about the boy's subsequent career.
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Boys entering Leeds Grammar School (1852-1852)

The admission books for Leeds Grammar School from 1820 to 1900 were edited by Edmund Wilson and published in 1906. The series of registers is almost complete for the period, there being in addition admission registers for the Lower (or Commercial) Department from 1856 to 1865, and lists of boys in the school in 1856, and in the Commercial Department in 1861. The entries are arranged by date or term of admission: a sequential number is given first, then surname, christian name, and, after a dash, father's christian name, occupation, and address; another dash, and then the age of the boy at admission, and often his year of leaving (with the abbreviation r. for 'removed' or 'left'). r.* means left without notice; (o) or S. or Stranger or Foreigner indicates a boy not on the foundation. The editor was unable to divine the meaning of the abbreviation (Q) or the asterisks prefixed to most entries in 1856 to 1860, but dutifully copies them into the text. In smaller type he then proceeds, where possible, to add some information about the boy's subsequent career.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1852-1852)

This First Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; and a synopsis of his career, so far as known.
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Boys entering Sedbergh School (1852-1852)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Boys entering Uppingham School (1852-1852)

The public school at Uppingham in Rutland was founded by Archdeacon Johnson in 1584. A roll of scholars from 1824 to 1905 was edited by J. P. Graham, and published in 1906. This was a revision and updating of an 1894 edition of the roll, the great bulk of the work having been done by Mrs Mullins. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy's name is given, surname first, with an asterisk where known (in 1906) to have died. Then there is month and year of birth, father's name (most often just surname and initials) and address (at entrance). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), that is indicated. After the month and year of leaving the school, there is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, address as in 1906.
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Boys entering Tonbridge School (1852-1852)

W. O. Hughes-Hughes, late Assistant-Master of Tonbridge School, prepared this edition of the school register. The Kent grammar school was founded by royal charter in 1553, but the surviving register commences with the names of 69 boys called over on Skinners' Day 1826. After that they are arranged alphabetically by quarter to 1833, and thereafter by term of entry. Each entry gives, where known: the boy's surname (in capitals) and full christian name(s); the years when at the school; father's name; year of birth; school honours; and a resume of his subsequent career.
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Traders in Greenwich, Woolwich &c. (1852-1852)

W. Archdeacon's Greenwich and Woolwich Directory for 1852 (including Deptford, Blackheath, Lewisham, Charlton, Plumstead, Shooter's Hill, Lee,&c.) has two long alphabetical listings, commercial and private residents.
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Private Residents in Greenwich, Woolwich &c. (1852-1852)

W. Archdeacon's Greenwich and Woolwich Directory for 1852 (including Deptford, Blackheath, Lewisham, Charlton, Plumstead, Shooter's Hill, Lee,&c.) has two long alphabetical listings, commercial and private residents.
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Maldon Voters (1852-1852)

This poll book for the election of a member of parliament to represent Maldon in Essex at the general election in 1852 gives the full names of all voters (surname first: occupiers distinguished by an asterisk) with occupation, address, and for whom they voted.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Aby with Greenfield (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Addlethorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Aisthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Alford (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Alkborough (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Althorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Alvingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Amcotts (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Anderby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Apley (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Appleby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Asgarby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Ashby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Ashby-Puerorum (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Ashby near Spilsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Ashby cum Fenby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Asterby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Aswardby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Atterby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Authorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Aylesby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bag Enderby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bardney (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Barlings (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Barnetby-le-Wold (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Barnoldby le Beck (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Barrow (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Barton upon Humber (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Baumber (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Beelsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Beesby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or £10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Belchford (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Belleau (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Belton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Benington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Benniworth (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bigby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bilsby with Thursby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Binbrook (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Biscathorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bishop Norton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Blyborough (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Blyton-cum-Wharton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bolingbroke (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bonby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Boston (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bottesford (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bracebridge (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Brackenborough (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bradley (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Brampton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Branston (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bratoft (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Brattleby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Brigsley (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Brinkhill (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Brocklesby with Little Limber (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Broughton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Broxholme (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.140 allison burnside
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Brumby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bucknall (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Bullington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Burgh (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Burgh on Bain-cum-Girsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Burringham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Gate Burton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Burton by Lincoln (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Burton on Stather (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Burwell (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Buslingthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Butterwick (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cabourne (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cadney-cum-Housham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cainby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Caistor (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Calceby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Calcethorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cammeringham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Candlesby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Canwick (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Carrington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cherry Willingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Claxby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Claxby Pluckacre (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Claxby near Market Rasen (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Claythorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or £10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cleatham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Clee and Weelsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cleethorpes (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Clixby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Coates (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cold Hanworth (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Coningsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Conisholme (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Corringham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Covenham St Bartholomew (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Covenham St Mary (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Croft (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Crosby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Crowle (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Croxby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Croxton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cumberworth (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Cuxwold (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Dalby with Dexthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Dalderby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Donington on Bain (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Driby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Dunholme (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Butterwick (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Ferry (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Halton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Keal (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Kirkby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Ravendale (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Stockwith (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Torrington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Barkwith (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: East Firsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Eastoft (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Eastville (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Edlington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Elsham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Epworth (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Faldingworth (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Farforth cum Maidenwell (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Farlesthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Fenton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Fillingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Freiston (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Friesthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Firsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Fishtoft (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Fiskerton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Flixborough (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Fotherby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Friskney (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Frithville (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Frodingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Fulletby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Fulnetby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Fulstow (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Gainsborough (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Garthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Gautby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Gayton-le-Marsh (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Gayton-le-Wold (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Glanford Brigg (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Glentham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Glentworth (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Goltho (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Goulceby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Goxhill (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Grainsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Grainthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Grasby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Grayingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Great Carlton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Great Coates (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Great Grimsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Great Limber (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Great Steeping (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Great Sturton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Greetham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Greetwell (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Grimoldby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Gunby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Gunhouse (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hackthorn (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hagnaby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hagworthingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hainton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Haltham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Halton Holegate (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hameringham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hannah cum Hagnaby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Habrough (Harbrough) (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hardwick (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hareby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Harpswell (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Harrington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hatcliffe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hatton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Haugham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hawerby cum Beesby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Haxey (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Healing (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Heapham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hemingby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hemswell (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hibaldstow (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: High Toynton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hogsthorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Holme (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Holton cum Beckering (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Holton-le-Clay (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Holton-le-Moor (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Horkstow (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Horncastle (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Horsington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Humberstone (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Hundleby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Huttoft (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Immingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Ingham (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Ingoldmells (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Irby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Irby (near Spilsby) (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Keadby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Keddington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Keelby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Kelstern (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Kettlethorpe (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Kexby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Kingerby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Kirkby cum Osgodby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Kirkby-on-Bain (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
>> Search this source

North Lincolnshire Voters: Kirkstead (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Kirmington (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Kirmond-le-Mire (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Kirton in Lindsey (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Knaith (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Laceby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Langriville (Langrick) (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Langton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Langton by Wragby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Langton near Spilsby (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Laughton (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Lea (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Leake (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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North Lincolnshire Voters: Legbourne (1852-1852)

The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value.
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