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Unclaimed Naval Prize Money from the China War (1856-1860)
Various prize moneys were awarded to officers and men who served on board her Majesty's ships on the China Station during the war of 1856 to 1880. Firstly, there was a parliamentary grant of one month's pay to those serving on the Acorn*, Actaeon*, Adventure, Algerine*, Amethyst, Assistance*, Banterer*, Barracouta, Belleisle, Bustard, Calcutta*, Camilla, Clown*, Comus, Cormorant, Cruiser*, Drake*, Elk*, Encounter, Esk*, Firm*, Forester*, Furious*, Fury, Haughty*, Hesper*, Highflyer*, Hornet*, Inflexible*, Janus*, Kestrel*, Lee*, Leven*, Melville, Minden, Nankin*, Niger*, Nimrod*, Opossum*, Pique, Plover*, Princess Charlotte, Racehorse*, Raleigh, Sampson*, Sans Pareil*, Slaney*, Spartan, Starling*, Staunch*, Surprise*, Sybille*, Tribune, Volcano*, Watchful*, Winchester, and Woodcock*; in addition Canton booty was awarded to those serving on the ships asterisked (plus the Bittern and Coromandel tenders) at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and captured. Then those on board the Bustard, Cruiser, Esk, Forester, Haughty, Highflyer, Lee, Niger, Nimrod, Sampson, Surprise, and the boats of the Elk, were rewarded for the captures of junks for breach of blockade of Canton River between 29 August and 19 December 1857. Other captures made by her Majesty's ships led to various other awards distributed between 1 January 1855 and 19 February 1863. Nevertheless, for one reason or another a substantial number of these prizes, from as little as 1s 7d to as much as £28, remained undistributed by 1902, when this comprehensive list of the unclaimed moneys was printed. In each case the sailor's name is given first (surname, then christian name or initials); rank or rating; ship in which serving at time of capture or award; parliamentary award; Canton booty; captures for breach of blockade of Canton River; other captures; and then the total.
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Unclaimed Naval Prize Money from the China War
 (1856-1860)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot, based at Cork, embarked for India in September 1858, and was transferred to China in 1860; moved to South Africa in 1865, and returned to England in 1869. The regiment took part in the capture of Pekin.
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British infantry fighting in China
 (1860)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Liverpool (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Liverpool
 (1861)
Boys entering Epsom College (1864)
The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.) This is the index to the year 1864, when the Reverend Robinson Thornton was headmaster.
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Boys entering Epsom College
 (1864)
National ArchivesMen of the 57th Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War (1860-1870)
New Zealand War Medal roll for the 57th (The West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot: for service in the New Zealand campaign 1863 to 1867: the rolls were compiled following a general order in 1869 and the medals were distributed in 1870. The regiment had been serving at Poonah in India, and was moved to New Zealand in November 1860; the men returned to England in April 1867.
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Men of the 57th Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War
 (1860-1870)
London University Matriculation List (1870)
The matriculation list of the University of London published in January 1870 shows all the students entering the university 1865 to 1869, but who had not yet taken an examination. The alphabetical list gives full name, surname first; year of matriculation; and the name of the school or college (or private study or the name of a tutor) of previous education.
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London University Matriculation List
 (1870)
Infants in Fermoy Workhouse, County Cork (1872)
Return, “with Christian and Surname of each, of Infants Born in Irish Workhouses, or Admitted thereto when Healthy under Twelve Months Old, and attempted to be Reared therein during the Years 1872 to 1874, showing what has since become of them”. The returns from each poor law union workhouse give: Christian and Surname of Infant Born in the Workhouse, or Admitted Healthy, under Twelve Months; Year; and whether discharged, healthy, in hospital, or dead.
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Infants in Fermoy Workhouse, County Cork
 (1872)
Infants in Cork Workhouse (1874)
Return, “with Christian and Surname of each, of Infants Born in Irish Workhouses, or Admitted thereto when Healthy under Twelve Months Old, and attempted to be Reared therein during the Years 1872 to 1874, showing what has since become of them”. The returns from each poor law union workhouse give: Christian and Surname of Infant Born in the Workhouse, or Admitted Healthy, under Twelve Months; Year; and whether discharged, healthy, in hospital, or dead.
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Infants in Cork Workhouse
 (1874)
Pupil Teachers training to become Schoolmistresses (1875)
The Education Department set examinations for candidates for admission into training colleges, and to become teachers. This is the class list (in order of merit) of the women who took that examination at Christmas 1875, and who were awarded Second Class results. The first column gives the position in the exam results (no number is inserted where the candidate obtained the same marks as the last to whose name a number is prefixed); then there is the candidate's name (surname first); school in which engaged (N. for National School, Ch. Church of England, B. British School, W. Wesleyan, R. Roman Catholic, P. Parochial, Bd. Board School, U. Poor Law Union School); and then Training College at which examined. (The sample scan is from a general class list for schoolmistresses)
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Pupil Teachers training to become Schoolmistresses
 (1875)
Inhabitants of Maidenhead in Berkshire (1877)
Gentry, farmers and traders listed in J. G. Harrod's Royal County Directory of Berkshire. (The sample scan is from the section for Wallingford)
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Inhabitants of Maidenhead in Berkshire
 (1877)
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