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Tradesmen of York (1272-1558)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city.Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 19,900 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year, the year being here reckoned as starting at Michaelmas (29 September) until 1373, and thence at Candlemas (2 February). Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; and those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.
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Tradesmen of York
 (1272-1558)
Fines: Derbyshire (1558)
Fines for fictitious actions of covenant in the Common Pleas were a way of registering the transfer of landed property. The originals, entered on the Common Roll for Michaelmas term, 5 & 6 Philip & Mary and 1 Elizabeth, 1558 are here abstracted into English by David Bethell: the grantee is in each case the person named in the third line, covenanting with the grantor(s). The description of the estate names the number of messuages (houses), acres of (arable) land, pasture, meadow, &c. CP 40/1176 mm.1-100.
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Fines: Derbyshire
 (1558)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1591-1592)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters
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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1591-1592)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1591-1592)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters
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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1591-1592)
Lord Willoughby in the Netherlands (1580-1601)
Mrs S. C. Lomas of the Historical Manuscripts Commission prepared this calendar of the manuscripts of the Earl of Ancaster preserved at Grimsthorpe, published in 1907. The records covered are from 1550 to 1737, but the bulk of this volume is given over to an edition of the correspondence of Peregrine lord Willoughby, who was appointed governor of Bergen-op-Zoom in 1586, and spent the next ten years commanding English and Dutch forces against those of Spain. There are also a few pages (449 to 452) dealing with a scattering of ancient deeds (from c.1160 to 1547); some items from inventories (452-459, c.1522 to after 1742) and household accounts (459-482, 1560-1661) which attracted Mrs Lomas's attention; and notes from a muster roll of Baberg hundred, Suffolk, of about 1522, from which some names are given in the text.
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Lord Willoughby in the Netherlands
 (1580-1601)
Inhabitants of Ripon (1354-1609)
In 1888 the Surtees Society published, as the 3rd volume of Memorials of the Church of SS Peter and Wilfrid, Ripon, a collection of extracts from a variety of sources relating to the minster - a copy of the appropriate section from the Valor Ecclesiasticus of 1535-6; chantry certificates of 1546-7; ministers' accounts of 1547-9; fabric rolls (giving accounts of expenditure on the buildings) from 1354 to 1542; a paper book of about 1520; treasurers' rolls from 1401 to 1485; chamberlains' rolls from 1410 to 1558; an inquisition of 1609 (from the Duchy of Lancaster archives); and extracts from the diocesan archives of 1567 to 1580. The people that appear in these records are not only the clergy, but also workmen maintaining and repairing the fabric, local tenants, and the names of the deceased whose obits incurred small payments to the church.
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Inhabitants of Ripon
 (1354-1609)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.
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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Yorkshire Marriage Licences (1629)
William Paver, a 19th-century Yorkshire genealogist, made brief abstracts of early marriage licences (now lost) in York Registry
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Yorkshire Marriage Licences
 (1629)
Southwell Peculiar Baptisms, Marriages and Burials (1614-1641)
Each year a copy of the previous year's register of baptisms, marriages and burials, attested by the incumbent and churchwardens, was returned to the diocesan authorities. The peculiar of Southwell in Nottinghamshire was ordinarily exempt from episcopal jurisdiction in such matters, and the 24 parishes in the peculiar made similar returns to the Southwell registry. A few of these survive from this period, and they were transcribed by T. N. Blagg and printed as the first volume of the Record Series of the Thoroton Society in 1903. The returns are for Beckingham 1634, 1637, 1641; Bleasby 1633; Blidworth 1638; Calverton 1617, 1623; *Caunton 1614, 1619, 1628, 1641; Cropwell Bishop 1638, 164; Darlton 1622, 1633, 1641; *Dunham 1641; Edingley 1638; Farnsfield 1623; Halam 1622, 1637; Halloughton 1622, 1637; *Holme 1623, 1625, 1627, 1638, 1641; Kirklington 1622, 1638; *Morton 1622, 1623; *North Muskham 1623, 1633, 1638; South Muskham 1623; *Norwell 1638, 1641; Oxton 1622; *Ragnall 1623; Southwell 1633, 1640; Tithby (cum Cropwell Butler) 1625; Upton 1633, 1638; and Woodborough 1623, 1627, 1637, 1638 and 1640. Parishes marked with an asterisk (*) are those for which the original registers were missing for the period covered by the transcripts.
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Southwell Peculiar Baptisms, Marriages and Burials
 (1614-1641)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1645)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.
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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1645)
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