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Our indexes include entries for the spelling fyssher. In the period you have requested, we have the following 57 records (displaying 51 to 57): 

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Middlesex Sessions (1549-1603)
This printed calendar collates a number of surviving records from Middlesex sessions for the period. Principally these are the Gaol Delivery Rolls (G. D. R.) and the General Sessions of the Peace Rolls (G. S. O. P. R.). Both series cover general criminal indictments (bills) together with the recognizances of the witnesses to attend; but the Gaol Delivery Rolls, by their very nature, tend to deal with the more serious cases - felonies where the accused could not be released on bail. The General Sessions rolls also include the sheriff's lists of bailiffs, sub-bailiffs, high and petty constables in the shire; writs of venire facias for production of jurors, writs of capias, lists of jurors, jury-panels &c. The Gaol Delivery Rolls also include coroners' inquests, writs of supersedeas, and memoranda of proclamations. Special inquiries are recorded in separate Sessions of Oyer and Terminer (S. O. T.) rolls and Inquest or Inquisition rolls (I. R.) Although coverage is good, none of the sequences of rolls for this period is complete. A peculiarity of this calendar is that in the case of actual incidents, the date given at the start of each entry is the date that the incident was alleged to have taken place (for instance, 1 June 11 Elizabeth (1569) in the sample scan) rather than the date of the court proceedings.
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Middlesex Sessions
 (1549-1603)
Knaresborough testators, legatees and witnesses (1510-1606)
Knaresborough in the West Riding of Yorkshire lay in the ancient diocese of York, but was part of a large separate probate jurisdiction or peculiar encompassing the parishes of Burton Leonard, Farnham cum Scotton, Fewston, Great Ouseburn, Hampsthwaite, Knaresborough, South Stainley, Staveley, and some small adjoining areas. Grants of probate and administration, as well as copies of wills, were recorded on the Knaresborough court rolls. Dr Francis Collins prepared abstracts of all enrolled wills, grants of administration, and of tuition, from the 2nd year of the reign of king Henry VIII to the 3rd and 4th of James I, 'no matter how insignificant in life the testator may have been or how uninteresting the will', and these were published by the Surtees Society in 1902.
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Knaresborough testators, legatees and witnesses
 (1510-1606)
Middlesex Sessions (1603-1625)
Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the three volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, four volumes of Sessions of Peace Register and two volumes of Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the reign of king James I. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry.
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Middlesex Sessions
 (1603-1625)
Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.
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Tradesmen of York
 (1559-1759)
Freemen of Canterbury by Gift (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by gift.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Gift
 (1392-1800)
Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by redemption.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption
 (1392-1800)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.
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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
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