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Our indexes include entries for the spelling fowkes. In the period you have requested, we have the following 189 records (displaying 81 to 90): 

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Voters in Northampton (1826)
A poll to elect two burgesses to represent the town and borough of Northampton, was held there 12 to 20 June 1826. This poll book lists the voters alphabetically by surname, giving christian name, abode, occupation (in italics), and whether they voted for sir George Robinson, sir Robert Henry Gunning, or William Leader Maberly.
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Voters in Northampton
 (1826)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1828)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders
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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1828)
Irish Insolvents (1829)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants
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Irish Insolvents
 (1829)
Revenue Coast Guard (1830-1831)
Appointments 11 August 1830 to 11 August 1831: 1a. Return of all persons appointed to situations in the department of the Excise, and of persons nominated as expectants to receive instructions to qualify them to become officers: giving date of appointment or nomination; name; station; salary and emolument. 1b. Return of all persons re-appointed to situations in the Excise: giving name; station in which dropped; salary and emoluments; when and to what station re-appointed; salary and emoluments. This return is split into England, Scotland and Ireland. 2. Return of the different persons appointed to situations in the departments of the Customs: stating port; office; name of officer; when admitted; and salary and emoluments. 3. This return of men appointed to situations in the Revenue Coast Guard: with date of appointment; name; rank; salary; and emoluments.
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Revenue Coast Guard
 (1830-1831)
Leicester Poll Book: Resident Voters (1832)
A poll was taken on 12 and 13 December 1832 for the election of two representatives in Parliament for the borough of Leicester, the candidates being William Evans esquire (E.), Wynn Ellis esquire (El.) and J. W. Boughton Leigh esquire (L.). This poll book, printed by J. G. Brown of Leicester, gives the name, residence and occupation of all the electors, divided into four categories: resident voters, non-resident voters, resident non-voters, and non-resident non-voters. For those who polled, their votes are marked on the right hand side. Under the 1832 Reform Act the franchise within the borough had been extended to all (adult male) owners or tenants of property worth 10 a year or more.
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Leicester Poll Book: Resident Voters
 (1832)
Bankruptcy Dividends (1835)
Dividends from bankrupts' estates
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Bankruptcy Dividends
 (1835)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.
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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1837)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders: in England and Wales
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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1837)
Shareholders of the Stourbridge and Kidderminster Bank (1838)
The provincial banks of England and Wales made annual returns to the Stamp Office of their proprietors or shareholders. These returns, registered in March 1838, from the 103 banks then in existence, contain the full names and addresses of nearly 30,000 shareholders.
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Shareholders of the Stourbridge and Kidderminster Bank
 (1838)
Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors (1840)
Principal creditors petitioning to force a bankruptcy (but often close relatives of the bankrupt helping to protect his assets): and solicitors
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Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors
 (1840)
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