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Our indexes include entries for the spelling fournier. In the period you have requested, we have the following 57 records (displaying 51 to 57): 

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Missing Heirs in Chancery Suits (1886)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This section of the 1886 edition was devoted to 'Unclaimed Property in Chancery': "THE following is a list of the titles of causes in the Court of Chancery, to the credit of which funds have remained unclaimed for many years, and for which ADVERTISEMENTS have appeared calling upon the NEXT-OF-KIN, HEIRS-AT-LAW, and LEGAL PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES to come in and establish their claims. In every case the amount UNCLAIMED is upwards of FIFTY POUNDS."
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Missing Heirs in Chancery Suits
 (1886)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1905)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in about 1905.
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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1905)
Freemasons in Tuscan chapter, London (1938)
List of members of the Ancient and Accepted Rite for England, Wales, the Dominions and Dependencies of the British Crown, January 1938. An asterisk before a name indicates a P. M. W. S. of the Chapter; the number 30 indicates a Grand Elected Knight, K. H., 30th Degree; 31, Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander, 31st Degree; 32, Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret, 32nd Degree.
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Freemasons in Tuscan chapter, London
 (1938)
Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: 2nd Lieutenants (1946)
The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: 2nd Lieutenants
 (1946)
Doctors trained in Britain or Ireland but living abroad (1948)
The Medical Directory was split into several sections. The Practitioners Resident Abroad section covered all medical practitioners who, having qualified in Britain or Ireland, were living abroad. Each year a schedule was sent to each doctor to be returned to the publishers, so as to keep the directory up to date. In the directory the doctor's name is given first, in bold, surname first, in capitals; then current address. Next are the qualifications; the italic abbreviations in parentheses following the qualifications indicate the medical school at which they were gained. Then there is a list of posts and honours within the profession, starting with those then current; previous posts are preceded by the word 'late'. Finally, brief details are given of any publications. Inclusion of names in the list did not imply a right to practise in the country of residence.
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Doctors trained in Britain or Ireland but living abroad
 (1948)
Electrical Engineers (1952)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. There were seven grades of member (honorary member, member, associate member, companion, associate, graduate, and student); this is the list of the 19,699 members of the latter three grades as of 1 July 1952. Most of the members were from Britain, but there were Oversea Branches for Calcutta, Ceylon and Ireland, and Oversea Committees in Australia, India, Malaya and Singapore, New Zealand and South Africa. The associates (A), graduates (G) and students (S) are listed together in a single alphabetical list by surname and christian name(s), with year of entering the grade. Some of the members also belonged to specialized sections of the institution, and these are indicated at the right by the letters M (measurements), R (radio), S (supply) and U (utilization).
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Electrical Engineers
 (1952)
Anglican clergy (1957)
Crockford's Clerical Directory listed all Anglican clergy in the British Isles, India, Africa, Canada, the West Indies, Europe, Australasia and South America. The 77th issue, for 1957-58, is based on returns from all the individuals listed, and was deemed correct as of 30 September 1957. The details given are: name (surname first, in capitals) in bold; name of theological college and/or university, and degrees, with years; a bold d followed by year and diocese signifies date of ordination as deacon and by which bishop; then a bold p, similarly for ordination as priest; posts (C: curate; I: incumbent; V; vicar; R: rector) with parishes and years; address; telephone number; and lists of books &c. where appropriate. In the case of the man then holding an English, Irish, Scottish or Welsh benefice, additional details are given - a bold P signifies the patron of the advowson; then the income, with items such as Q. A. B. (Queen Anne's Bounty), Eccles(iastical) Comm(issioners), Fees, e. o. (Easter Offerings), Pew Rents, T(ithe) R(ent) C(harge), Gl(ebe), &c.
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Anglican clergy
 (1957)
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