£75.00 EBook Add to Basket >>

£90.00 DVD Add to Basket >>

Add this eBook to your basket to receive access to all 344 records.

Our indexes include entries for the spelling forman. In the period you have requested, we have the following 344 records (displaying 221 to 230): 

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Members of Oxford University (1860)
The Oxford University Calendar for 1860 includes this list of all living members of the university, i. e. not only undergraduates and members of staff, but also all surviving graduates from earlier generations. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname, then by college in order of foundation. Surnames are given, initials, highest degree, name of college, and then the year of graduating the first degree. For undergraduates only name and college is given. An asterisk before a surname indicates a member on the foundation of the college.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Members of Oxford University
 (1860)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Flamer (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Flamer
 (1860)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Lincoln (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Lincoln
 (1861)
Residents and Traders in Birmingham (1861)
William Cornish's Corporation General and Trades Directory covered Birmingham, Coventry and the towns of the Black Country. The Birmingham section contains both street lists and this general alphabetical directory.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Residents and Traders in Birmingham
 (1861)
Boys entering Loretto School (1863)
The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys entering Loretto School
 (1863)
Boys entering Sherborne School (1863)
The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys entering Sherborne School
 (1863)
Missionaries and contributors (1863)
The Evangelical Magazine and Missionary Chronicle records the work of Christian missionaries throughout the world, and of the supporting missionary societies collecting money for the work in the British Isles. Contributions are listed by congregation, and by family members making donations.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Missionaries and contributors
 (1863)
Missionaries and contributors (1864)
The Evangelical Magazine and Missionary Chronicle records the work of Christian missionaries throughout the world, and of the supporting missionary societies collecting money for the work in the British Isles. Contributions are listed by congregation, and by family members making donations.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Missionaries and contributors
 (1864)
Unclaimed Money and Property (1864)
Gun & Co. of 17 Charlotte Street, London, published this 'List of Next of Kin & Heirs, &c., who have been Advertised for in the English, Irish, Scotch, United States of America, Canadian, Australian, East and West Indian, and other Newspapers, since 1704. Money & Property to the value of many Millions Sterling want Claimants'. The list of 4076 names gives surname, christian name, and, occasionally, locality. Copies of the actual advertisements were furnished to enquirers by the company at a cost of six shillings.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Unclaimed Money and Property
 (1864)
Country Members of the Pharmaceutical Society (1865)
The annual list of Members, Associates and Apprentices of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain includes lists of London Members and Country Members (giving year of membership, number of certificate (if any), full name (surname first), and address: an asterisk indicates a Life Member); Associates admitted before 1 July 1842 (with full name, and where registered); Associates of the Society who had passed the Major Examination and were registered as Pharmaceutical Chemists, and Associates of the Society who had passed the Minor Examination and were registered as Assistants (year of admission, number of certificate, full name, and where registered); and Registered Apprentices (with date of registration, full name, residing with, and town).
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Country Members of the Pharmaceutical Society
 (1865)
Previous page1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35Next page

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.