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North Lincolnshire Non-Voters: Horncastle Polling District (1852)
The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or 10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value. At the end of each polling district is a list of electors who did not vote, many living at a distance from the area.
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North Lincolnshire Non-Voters: Horncastle Polling District
 (1852)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1853)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. January to June 1853
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1853)
Inhabitants of Halifax, Yorkshire (1853)
William White's directory lists traders, farmers and private residents in the area.
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Inhabitants of Halifax, Yorkshire
 (1853)
Medical Men (1853)
The British Medical Directory for England, Scotland, and Wales of 1853 lists doctors, physicians, surgeons and other medical men. Each entry gives full name, surname first; address; qualifications; public appointments; and (where appropriate) a list of books and of works published in medical journals.
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Medical Men
 (1853)
Bankrupts' Assignments (1855)
Assignments of bankrupts' estates (usually to principal creditors and/or close relatives of the bankrupt) in England and Wales
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Bankrupts' Assignments
 (1855)
Insolvents (1855)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links
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Insolvents
 (1855)
Unclaimed Dividends (1855)
The unclaimed dividend books of the Bank of England, containing names and descriptions of over 20,000 persons entitled to many millions of pounds accumulated in the bank unclaimed during the 18th and 19th centuries, mostly in consols and annuities, and transferred to the Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt.
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Unclaimed Dividends
 (1855)
National ArchivesMarines on H. M. S. Agamemnon in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). This is the list of officers and men of the Marine Brigade borne by this ship and awarded the Crimea Medal. Her Majesty's Ship Agamemnon, a 91-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself (September 1854 to September 1855), Inkerman (5 November 1854), Balaklave (Balaclava) (25 October 1854) and (the sea of) Azoff. In this list the column headed 'No. on Ship's Book' has been used to show for each man entitlement to the clasps for B(alaclava), I(nkerman) and/or S(ebastopol).
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Marines on H. M. S. Agamemnon in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Agamemnon in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Agamemnon, a 91-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.
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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Agamemnon in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Arrow in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Arrow, a 6-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.
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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Arrow in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
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