£75.00 EBook Add to Basket >>

£90.00 DVD Add to Basket >>

Add this eBook to your basket to receive access to all 360 records.

Our indexes include entries for the spelling fordham. In the period you have requested, we have the following 360 records (displaying 211 to 220): 

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Missionary donations from Cambridgeshire (1855)
The Congregational and a number of other independent churches together formed the Evangelical Alliance, committed to promoting and supporting missions to the heathen. The areas chosen for their projects were Guiana, South Africa, India, the South Seas and China. The work of the missionaries was not only in preaching the Gospel, but also in translating the Bible into local languages, and establishing churches, schools and orphanages. Orphans and native teachers were often given the names of principal contributors or congregations back in Britain. In Britain the large amounts of money needed for this work were raised among the Congregational and independent congregations, arranged by auxiliaries for each county (although some contributions for each county might in fact come in from congregations and individuals in neighbouring areas); money was gathered by ministers, at special services, by supporters, and in missionary boxes. The accounts of all these contributions were published as part of a monthly magazine called the Evangelical Magazine. Each issue of the magazine carried obituaries of prominent members of the congregations; general articles on religion; reviews of newly-published religious books; home news, mainly about meetings of importance or interest by the alliance or in individual churches; and then a separate section called the Missionary Chronicle. The Missionary Chronicle was devoted to letters and reports from the missionaries; and concludes with a set of accounts of donations towards the missionary work. This is the index to the donations reported in the magazine, January to December 1855, from Cambridgeshire.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Missionary donations from Cambridgeshire
 (1855)
Missionary donations from Huntingdonshire (1855)
The Congregational and a number of other independent churches together formed the Evangelical Alliance, committed to promoting and supporting missions to the heathen. The areas chosen for their projects were Guiana, South Africa, India, the South Seas and China. The work of the missionaries was not only in preaching the Gospel, but also in translating the Bible into local languages, and establishing churches, schools and orphanages. Orphans and native teachers were often given the names of principal contributors or congregations back in Britain. In Britain the large amounts of money needed for this work were raised among the Congregational and independent congregations, arranged by auxiliaries for each county (although some contributions for each county might in fact come in from congregations and individuals in neighbouring areas); money was gathered by ministers, at special services, by supporters, and in missionary boxes. The accounts of all these contributions were published as part of a monthly magazine called the Evangelical Magazine. Each issue of the magazine carried obituaries of prominent members of the congregations; general articles on religion; reviews of newly-published religious books; home news, mainly about meetings of importance or interest by the alliance or in individual churches; and then a separate section called the Missionary Chronicle. The Missionary Chronicle was devoted to letters and reports from the missionaries; and concludes with a set of accounts of donations towards the missionary work. This is the index to the donations reported in the magazine, January to December 1855, from Huntingdonshire.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Missionary donations from Huntingdonshire
 (1855)
Unclaimed Dividends (1855)
The unclaimed dividend books of the Bank of England, containing names and descriptions of over 20,000 persons entitled to many millions of pounds accumulated in the bank unclaimed during the 18th and 19th centuries, mostly in consols and annuities, and transferred to the Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Unclaimed Dividends
 (1855)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Dauntless in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Dauntless, a 24-gun screw steamer frigate, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Dauntless in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Inflexible in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Inflexible, a 6-gun steam sloop, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Inflexible in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
Crystal Palace Company Shareholders (1856)
The management of the Crystal Palace, built for the Great Exhibition of 1851, was restructured by a Deed of Settlement in 1852, and then incorporated as the Crystal Palace Company by royal charter in January 1853. This alphabetical list of shareholders was published in January 1856.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Crystal Palace Company Shareholders
 (1856)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1856)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. January to June 1856
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1856)
Gentry in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Court Directory', listing alphabetically by surname and christian name the upper class residents of the capital with their postal addresses. 'In order to afford space for the addresses, the abbreviation "esq." for esquire has no longer been appended to each name in the Court Directory. It should be understood that such should be added to the name of every gentleman in the following pages to which no inconsistent addition is affixed.' Decorations, honours &c. are generally given. Some gentlemen appear who are also listed (as professional men, &c.) in the commercial section. Those with second residences in the provinces usually have the country address given as well.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Gentry in London
 (1856)
Traders and professionals in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording over 100,000 individuals.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
Traders and professionals in London
 (1856)
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.
Sample scan, click to enlarge
London Policemen
 (1843-1857)
Previous page1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36Next page

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.