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Our indexes include entries for the spelling fordham. In the period you have requested, we have the following 360 records (displaying 21 to 30): 

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Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.
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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
Norfolk Feet of Fines (1307-1485)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk. These abstracts were prepared by Walter Rye.
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Norfolk Feet of Fines
 (1307-1485)
Landowners and tenants in Cambridgeshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.
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Landowners and tenants in Cambridgeshire
 (1345-1485)
Landowners and tenants in Norfolk (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.
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Landowners and tenants in Norfolk
 (1345-1485)
Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset (1001-1500)
Three early registers of the dean and chapter of Wells - the Liber Albus I (White Book; R I), Liber Albus II (R III), and Liber Ruber (Red Book; R II, section i) - were edited by W. H. B. Bird for the Historical Manuscripts Commissioners and published in 1907. These three books comprise, with some repetition, a cartulary of possessions of the cathedral, with grants of land dating back as early as the 8th century, well before the development of hereditary surnames in England; acts of the dean and chapter; and surveys of their estates, mostly in Somerset.
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Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset
 (1001-1500)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.
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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Official Papers (1547-1580)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.
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Official Papers
 (1547-1580)
Official Papers (1623)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes some material from previous years, as early as 1603.
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Official Papers
 (1623)
Middlesex Sessions (1603-1625)
Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the three volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, four volumes of Sessions of Peace Register and two volumes of Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the reign of king James I. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry.
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Middlesex Sessions
 (1603-1625)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1632)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1902, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.
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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1632)
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