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Our indexes include entries for the spelling fordham. In the period you have requested, we have the following 360 records (displaying 161 to 170): 

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Cambridgeshire Voters: Meldreth (1832)
The poll on the election of three knights of the shire to serve in Parliament for the county of Cambridge, was taken at Cambridge, Royston, Newmarket, Ely, Wisbech and Whittlesea 18 and 19 December 1832. The candidates were Henry John Adeane esquire, Richard Greaves Townley esquire, Charles Philip Yorke esquire and John Walbanke Childers esquire. This poll book sets out the names of the voters in alphabetical order hundred by hundred and parish by parish. The voters' full names are stated, surname first. The right hand column records their votes. The new qualification for suffrage in the counties, after the passage of the 1832 Great Reform Bill, was the possession of a freehold estate worth 40s a year or more, a copyhold or long leasehold of £10 a year or more, or a tenancy or short leasehold of £50 a year or more.
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Cambridgeshire Voters: Meldreth
 (1832)
Cambridgeshire Voters: Royston (1832)
The poll on the election of three knights of the shire to serve in Parliament for the county of Cambridge, was taken at Cambridge, Royston, Newmarket, Ely, Wisbech and Whittlesea 18 and 19 December 1832. The candidates were Henry John Adeane esquire, Richard Greaves Townley esquire, Charles Philip Yorke esquire and John Walbanke Childers esquire. This poll book sets out the names of the voters in alphabetical order hundred by hundred and parish by parish. The voters' full names are stated, surname first. The right hand column records their votes. The new qualification for suffrage in the counties, after the passage of the 1832 Great Reform Bill, was the possession of a freehold estate worth 40s a year or more, a copyhold or long leasehold of £10 a year or more, or a tenancy or short leasehold of £50 a year or more.
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Cambridgeshire Voters: Royston
 (1832)
Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London (1834)
The public prints of December 1834 carried this loyal address to king William IV of merchants, bankers, shipowners, traders and others connected with the city of London, requesting 'permission at the present juncture to address your Majesty for the purpose of renewing the expression of our dutiful and loyal attachment to your Majesty’s person and crown. Deeply sensible of the practical blessings we have hitherto enjoyed under our wisely mixed constitution of King, Lords, and Commons, and feeling that the free and legitimate exercise of the Royal prerogative forms an integral part of that constitution (as essential to the maintenance of our own liberties as to the power and dignity of the Throne), we beg humbly to assure your Majesty of our determination steadfastly to uphold the same by every means in our power. 'Feeling, in common with all classes of your Majesty’s subjects, the deep importance of applying to all real abuses, wherever they may be found, a wholesome and timely correction, and of effecting in our excellent institutions every improvement of which careful examination and experience may prove them to be susceptible, we desire further dutifully to express our entire confidence that these useful purposes will ever occupy your Majesty’s paternal care. Nor can we permit ourselves to believe that the importance of these objects will be less apparent to those to whom the powers of government have been recently intrusted.' Full names are given (or surname with initials), and address. Over 5000 subscribed.
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Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London
 (1834)
Minor offenders in Newmarket, Suffolk (1834-1835)
Justices of the Peace throughout England and Wales had the power of summary conviction for certain minor offences, principally vagrancy, poaching, petty theft, bastardy and assault. The magistrates' clerks for each district were required by Parliament to make a return of the names, offences, terms of imprisonment, and whether a written record was made of the proceedings, for the period from Michaelmas (29 September) 1834 to Michaelmas 1835. The return vary in completeness from magistrate to magistrate - the fullest returns also give the offender's address, the amount of fine or length of imprisonment, and/or the names of the justices.
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Minor offenders in Newmarket, Suffolk
 (1834-1835)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1835)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders
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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1835)
Electors in East Peckham (1835)
A poll to elect knights of the shire to represent the Western Division of the county of Kent in parliament was held in 1835, the candidates being Thomas Law Hodges (H), Thomas Rider (R) and sir William R. P. Geary (G). The poll started on January 19th; Rider withdrawing his name on that first day, the poll was closed prematurely, many electors not yet having voted. This poll book lists all the electors, whether they voted or not; the county franchise included not only male freeholders of 40s a year, but also £10 copyholders and long-leaseholders, and £50 short-leaseholders and tenants. For each elector the full name is given (surname first) and residence (often not the place for which qualified to vote). Votes are indicated by dashes in the right-hand columns.
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Electors in East Peckham
 (1835)
Electors in Greenwich (1835)
A poll to elect knights of the shire to represent the Western Division of the county of Kent in parliament was held in 1835, the candidates being Thomas Law Hodges (H), Thomas Rider (R) and sir William R. P. Geary (G). The poll started on January 19th; Rider withdrawing his name on that first day, the poll was closed prematurely, many electors not yet having voted. This poll book lists all the electors, whether they voted or not; the county franchise included not only male freeholders of 40s a year, but also £10 copyholders and long-leaseholders, and £50 short-leaseholders and tenants. For each elector the full name is given (surname first) and residence (often not the place for which qualified to vote). Votes are indicated by dashes in the right-hand columns.
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Electors in Greenwich
 (1835)
Insolvents (1835)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links
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Insolvents
 (1835)
Kent crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: victims and witnesses (1835)
Henry Buckler copied in shorthand the proceedings of trials at the Central Criminal Court in London, and his transcripts were printed. This volume (iii), from 1836, covers sessions i to vi of the Copeland mayoralty of 1835 to 1836. The bulk of the cases were from London and Middlesex, with separate sections for Essex, Kent and Surrey, but, preceding all these, Capital Convictions. The names of the accused are annotated with an asterisk to show if they had previously been in custody; an obelisk indicates a known associate of bad characters. Most cases resulted in a guilty verdict, and a large proportion of these led to a sentence of transportation to Australia. This index covers the victims, witnesses (including constables) and others mentioned incidentally in the Kent cases of December 1835.
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Kent crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: victims and witnesses
 (1835)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.
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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
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