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Our indexes include entries for the spelling folkes. In the period you have requested, we have the following 132 records (displaying 81 to 90): 

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Insolvents (1842)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links
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Insolvents
 (1842)
Norwich Residents, Officers and Officials (1842)
The Norwich Guide and Directory 'being an Historical and Topographical Description of the City and its Hamlets; with an Account of the Public Charities, and Correct Lists of the Various Professions, Trades, Public Institutions, Churches, Chapels, Municipal and other Offices; also the Names and Residences of the Nobility, Clergy, and Gentry; together with the Hours of the Arrival and Departure of the Mail and Post Coaches, Vans, Carriers, Steam and Sailing Vessels, and all Conveyances to London and the various Parts of the County of Norfolk', by G. K. Blyth, was published in 1842, and includes detailed lists of local institutions, trades and professions.
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Norwich Residents, Officers and Officials
 (1842)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1843)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1843)
Members of the Camden Society (1844)
The Camden Society for the Publication of Early Historical and Literary Remains was one of the leading antiquarian societies of its age. 1200 members paid 1 per annum in advance and received gratis whatever volumes were published by the society during the year. Members who paid an additional 10 thereby compounded for future subscription, and are indicated in this membership list (corrected to 2 May 1844) by the letter (c.).
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Members of the Camden Society
 (1844)
Railway Subscription Contracts (1845)
21,386,703 6s 4d was promised by about 10,000 subscribers of less than 2,000 per contract to the nearly 200 railway bills deposited in the Private Bill Office during the Session of Parliament for 1845. This alphabetical list gives the full names of the subscribers (surname first), description (i. e., occupation), place of abode, a numerical reference to the title of the railway, the amount subscribed to each, and total. There is a separate key to the titles of the railways.
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Railway Subscription Contracts
 (1845)
Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales (1849)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of dissolutions of partnerships gazetted in England and Wales. The names of the partners are given in full, surnames in capitals, followed by trade and address, and date of the end of the partnership. Each entry usually ends with the phrase 'Debts by ...', indicating which partner intended to continue, and resume the responsibilities of, the business. This is the index to the names of the partners, from the issues from January to December 1849.
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Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales
 (1849)
National ArchivesInhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851)
The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 5: described as: "Saint George's Road No 25 to No 51 inclusive - Prospect Cottages by 31 - Ely Place - West Place - West Square - South Street (3 houses) to the end of Parish - East Street & Stables - East Place and Court - North Place - & West Street." This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark, ecclesiastical district of St Jude. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 25 to 51 St Georges Road (including Prospect Cottage), 2 to 12 Ely Place, 6 to 11 West Place, 1 to 49 West Square, 11 and 12 South Street, 1 to 11 East Street, cottage and stables, 1 to 13 East Place and Court, 1 North House, 1 North Cottage, 2 to 7 North Place, 1 and 2 West Street.
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Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey
 (1851)
Traders and professionals in London (1851)
The Post Office London Directory for 1851 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording about 80,000 individuals.
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Traders and professionals in London
 (1851)
Schoolmistresses and trainees with Certificates of Merit (1856)
The Committee of Council on Education for England and Wales produced an annual report which included several lists of teachers and trainee teachers, including an Annual Calendar of Teachers who have Obtained Certificates of Merit (completed to 1 January 1856), from which this sample scan is taken. The teachers are listed alphabetically by surname and initial, with name of school, post town or county, and grade, as either certificate or class. Student teachers were classed at the end of each year of training, so the column for class shows a student's class (1, 2 or 3) at the end of their first or second year of training. The teacher may then be awarded a certificate of merit by Her Majesty's Inspector, in which case the class and division of the certificate awarded appears in the columns for Certificate. No certificate of merit was granted a student, as a teacher, until he or she had been for two years in charge of the same elementary school, and the certificate was granted on the basis of two reports of performance as a teacher in school. If the first report was favourable, the teacher was paid for the first year on the scale of the lowest class; if the second report was favourable, augmentation and class of certificate was fixed for the next five years, after which (and so on from time to time) the certificates were open to revision. The value of the certificate, in the first instance, was not fixed higher than the first division of the third class, for any student who had resided less than two years at a training school under inspection. This is the index to the schoolmistresses and female students in training schools.
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Schoolmistresses and trainees with Certificates of Merit
 (1856)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.
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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
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