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Our indexes include entries for the spelling driver. In the period you have requested, we have the following 715 records (displaying 321 to 330): 

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Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London (1834)
The public prints of December 1834 carried this loyal address to king William IV of merchants, bankers, shipowners, traders and others connected with the city of London, requesting 'permission at the present juncture to address your Majesty for the purpose of renewing the expression of our dutiful and loyal attachment to your Majesty’s person and crown. Deeply sensible of the practical blessings we have hitherto enjoyed under our wisely mixed constitution of King, Lords, and Commons, and feeling that the free and legitimate exercise of the Royal prerogative forms an integral part of that constitution (as essential to the maintenance of our own liberties as to the power and dignity of the Throne), we beg humbly to assure your Majesty of our determination steadfastly to uphold the same by every means in our power. 'Feeling, in common with all classes of your Majesty’s subjects, the deep importance of applying to all real abuses, wherever they may be found, a wholesome and timely correction, and of effecting in our excellent institutions every improvement of which careful examination and experience may prove them to be susceptible, we desire further dutifully to express our entire confidence that these useful purposes will ever occupy your Majesty’s paternal care. Nor can we permit ourselves to believe that the importance of these objects will be less apparent to those to whom the powers of government have been recently intrusted.' Full names are given (or surname with initials), and address. Over 5000 subscribed.
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Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London
 (1834)
Owners of British Merchantmen (1834)
Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping was established in 1834, following the demise of two earlier societies for registering shipping in Britain. The new register in 1834 was created from an alphabetical list of British ships with no more detail than name, master's name, tonnage, and port to which they belonged. Lloyd's insurance syndicate provided £1000 for the establishment of a new system of surveyors, and as the year progressed many of the entries in the register were then annotated with additional information - type of vessel (Bk, barque; Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; Lr, lugger; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow; Yt, yacht), place and year of build, owners, destined voyage, and classification of the vessel and its stores, with the month (indicated by the final number in the last column) of inspection. Underneath each of these amended entries details were given of construction and repair, with year - s., sheathed; d., doubled; C., coppered; I. B., iron bolts; s. M., sheathed with marine metal; s. Y. M., sheathed with yellow metal; F., felt; PH., patent hair; Cl., clincher; len., lengthened; lrp., large repairs; trp., thorough repairs; ND., new deck; M. TSds., new top-sides; W. C., wales cased; NW., new wales; Srprs, some repairs - and, in italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; Bh, beech; C., cedar; E., elm; F., fir; G., gum; Ght., greenheart; Hk., hackmatack; L., locust; L. O., live oak; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; R. P., red pine; Y. P., yellow pine; S., spruce; T., teak; W. O., white oak. The sample scan is from the main list. The seventh column, reserved for owners' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. This is the index to owners in the main list.
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Owners of British Merchantmen
 (1834)
Bankruptcy Dividends (1835)
Dividends from bankrupts' estates
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Bankruptcy Dividends
 (1835)
Bankrupts (1835)
Bankruptcy notices for England and Wales: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links
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Bankrupts
 (1835)
Electors in Lewisham (1835)
A poll to elect knights of the shire to represent the Western Division of the county of Kent in parliament was held in 1835, the candidates being Thomas Law Hodges (H), Thomas Rider (R) and sir William R. P. Geary (G). The poll started on January 19th; Rider withdrawing his name on that first day, the poll was closed prematurely, many electors not yet having voted. This poll book lists all the electors, whether they voted or not; the county franchise included not only male freeholders of 40s a year, but also £10 copyholders and long-leaseholders, and £50 short-leaseholders and tenants. For each elector the full name is given (surname first) and residence (often not the place for which qualified to vote). Votes are indicated by dashes in the right-hand columns.
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Electors in Lewisham
 (1835)
Insolvents (1835)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links
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Insolvents
 (1835)
Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors (1835)
Principal creditors petitioning to force a bankruptcy (but often close relatives of the bankrupt helping to protect his assets): and solicitors
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Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors
 (1835)
Surrey crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: victims and witnesses (1835)
Henry Buckler copied in shorthand the proceedings of trials at the Central Criminal Court in London, and his transcripts were printed. This volume (iii), from 1836, covers sessions i to vi of the Copeland mayoralty of 1835 to 1836. The bulk of the cases were from London and Middlesex, with separate sections for Essex, Kent and Surrey, but, preceding all these, Capital Convictions. The names of the accused are annotated with an asterisk to show if they had previously been in custody; an obelisk indicates a known associate of bad characters. Most cases resulted in a guilty verdict, and a large proportion of these led to a sentence of transportation to Australia. This index covers the victims, witnesses (including constables) and others mentioned incidentally in the Surrey cases of December 1835.
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Surrey crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: victims and witnesses
 (1835)
Poachers committed to prison at Swaffham in Norfolk (1833-1836)
In response to a parliamentary enquiry, returns were made in early 1836 from each of the gaols in England and Wales of the number of commitments, prosecutions, convictions and sentences under the game laws since 1 November 1833. The returns varied in scope; most give the full name of each poacher, date, and sentence. The usual offence is that of 'poaching', i. e. being out armed in the night in pursuit of game; occasionally it was aggravated by assaulting a gamekeeper &c.
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Poachers committed to prison at Swaffham in Norfolk
 (1833-1836)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.
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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
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