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Our indexes include entries for the spelling driscoll. In the period you have requested, we have the following 291 records (displaying 111 to 120): 

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National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Snake (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent.
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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Snake
 (1860)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Sparrowhawk (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent.
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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Sparrowhawk
 (1860)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: East London (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: East London
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Poplar Union (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Poplar Union
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: St George-in-the-East (Middlesex) (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: St George-in-the-East (Middlesex)
 (1861)
Masters of Workhouses: London and Middlesex (1863)
Most Poor Law Unions maintained a workhouse. The Union List for 1863, arranged by counties and unions, and spread across facing pages, gives in the final columns the names of the masters of each workhouse, and the number of inmates. This number is the number fixed by the Poor Law Board. A few related institutions - Houses of Industry for Out-door Poor, Industrial Schools, Houses of Recovery, &c., are also included, and there are also some masters of workhouses outside the Poor Law Union system maintained by parishes under local acts, and in Gilbert's Incorporations. All the masters and matrons are included in this index.
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Masters of Workhouses: London and Middlesex
 (1863)
Dublin Electors (1865)
This alphabetical list of electors for the City of Dublin for 1865 is annotated with details of the votes cast in the election of 15 July 1865 for a member of Parliament. The candidates were John Vance, Esq., D. L. (V), Benjamin Lee Guinness, Esq., D. L., LL. D. (G), and Jonathan Pim, Esq. (P). The first column gives, in bold, the initial of the ward in which lay the property that was the elector's qualification. The second column gives the elector's sequential number (alphabetically) within that ward. Then the elector's full name is given, surname first, and address, usually including house number. The votes cast are shown on the right: where these columns are blank, the elector did not vote. The key to the ward names is: A, South Dock; B, Donnybrook; C, Rathdown; D, Trinity; E, South City; F, Royal Exchange; G, Mansion House; H, Fitzwilliam; I, Wood Quay; K, Merchants' Quay; L, Usher's Quay; M, Arran Quay; N, Inns' Quay; O, North City; P, Rotundo; Q, Mountjoy; R; North Dock. S indicates the register of freemen.
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Dublin Electors
 (1865)
Residents and Householders of Croydon (1865)
The sixth edition of 'The Commercial and General Directory of the Town and Parish of Croydon; including South Norwood, Upper Norwood, Woodside, Stroud Green, and Shirley' published by F. Warren in 1865, includes this 'Alphabetical Arrangement of the Principal Residents and Householders'. The abbreviation S N stands for South Norwood; T H for Thornton Heath; and U N for Upper Norwood.
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Residents and Householders of Croydon
 (1865)
National ArchivesMen of the 57th Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War (1860-1870)
New Zealand War Medal roll for the 57th (The West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot: for service in the New Zealand campaign 1863 to 1867: the rolls were compiled following a general order in 1869 and the medals were distributed in 1870. The regiment had been serving at Poonah in India, and was moved to New Zealand in November 1860; the men returned to England in April 1867.
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Men of the 57th Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War
 (1860-1870)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the 44th regiment of Foot (1860-1870)
The 44th (The East Essex) Regiment of Foot embarked for India in 1857, after returning from the Crimea. It was serving in India in 1860. It helped suppress the Indian Mutiny. The regimental depot was at Colchester. Each year just a handful of outstanding soldiers of the regiment were chosen for good conduct medals and gratuities: these are listed here. There were two lists, one for men recommended for the Good Conduct Medal without a gratuity, and one for gratuities - 5 to a private, 10 to a corporal, and 15 to a serjeant. Both lists are indexed here, and each gives rank, name, regimental number, date of recommendation and date of issue. (The sample scan is from the 105th foot)
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Outstanding soldiers of the 44th regiment of Foot
 (1860-1870)
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